Bee Balm, Beebalm, Bergamot, Firecracker Plant, Horsemint, Mountain Mint, Oswego Tea
Monarda didyma 'Raspberry Wine'

Family: Lamiaceae (lay-mee-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Monarda (mo-NAR-da) (Info)
Species: didyma (DID-ee-muh) (Info)
Cultivar: Raspberry Wine
Hybridized by D. Probst
Registered or introduced: 1992
View this plant in a garden

Category:

Herbs

Perennials

Height:

36-48 in. (90-120 cm)

Spacing:

24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 C (-30 F)

USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 C (-25 F)

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

Red

Bloom Time:

Late Spring/Early Summer

Mid Summer

Late Summer/Early Fall

Foliage:

Herbaceous

Aromatic

Other details:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

By dividing the rootball

From herbaceous stem cuttings

Seed Collecting:

N/A: plant does not set seed, flowers are sterile, or plants will not come true from seed

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Cullman, Alabama

Florence, Alabama

Pelham, Alabama

Anchorage, Alaska

Palmer, Alaska

Fayetteville, Arkansas

Stamford, Connecticut

Delmar, Delaware

Tallahassee, Florida

Dacula, Georgia

Griffin, Georgia

Marietta, Georgia

Caseyville, Illinois

Peoria, Illinois

Huntington, Indiana

New Paris, Indiana

Rossville, Indiana

Ankeny, Iowa

Tiffin, Iowa

Derby, Kansas

Princeton, Kansas

Hebron, Kentucky

Louisville, Kentucky

Boston, Massachusetts

Brockton, Massachusetts

Hubbardston, Massachusetts

Milton, Massachusetts

Norton, Massachusetts

Minneapolis, Minnesota

Lincoln, Nebraska

Englishtown, New Jersey

Ringwood, New Jersey

East Hampton, New York

Mahopac, New York

Banner Elk, North Carolina

Concord, North Carolina

Greenville, North Carolina

Taylorsville, North Carolina

Belfield, North Dakota

Fort Jennings, Ohio

Geneva, Ohio

Madison, Ohio

Pataskala, Ohio

Perrysburg, Ohio

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Salem, Oregon

Allentown, Pennsylvania

Brookhaven, Pennsylvania

Roscoe, Pennsylvania

Wakefield, Rhode Island

Camden, South Carolina

Aberdeen, South Dakota

Knoxville, Tennessee

Austin, Texas

Belton, Texas

Fort Worth, Texas

Irving, Texas

Jacksonville, Texas

Salt Lake City, Utah

Leesburg, Virginia

Mc Lean, Virginia

Portsmouth, Virginia

Stafford, Virginia

Grandview, Washington

Kalama, Washington

Ridgefield, Washington

Seattle, Washington (2 reports)

Wheeling, West Virginia

Delavan, Wisconsin

Oconto, Wisconsin

show all

Gardeners' Notes:

6
positives
4
neutrals
1
negative
RatingContent
Neutral

On Jun 10, 2014, yooperexpat from Louisville, KY wrote:

I love bee balm, got the plant this year as a carried over quart perennial, good root system, very small growth. Planted in new bed (newspaper mulched grass. 6 hours sun, clay but with a lot of gravel in it). It's 3 feet high, 2 feet around and just starting to bloom. The foliage is great but so far I don't like the color. Kind of dull to my taste, guess I am still a big fan of RED bee balm. Got a hunch it's going to spread quickly so will move it back by the compost pile where it can go crazy and replace with a red.

Neutral

On Jun 10, 2014, yooperexpat from Louisville, KY wrote:

I love bee balm, got the plant this year as a carried over quart perennial, good root system, very small growth. Planted in new bed (newspaper mulched grass. 6 hours sun, clay but with a lot of gravel in it). It's 3 feet high, 2 feet around and just starting to bloom. The foliage is great but so far I don't like the color. Kind of dull to my taste, guess I am still a big fan of RED bee balm. Got a hunch it's going to spread quickly so will move it back by the compost pile where it can go crazy and replace with a red.

Neutral

On May 8, 2013, wakingdream from Allentown, PA wrote:

I must keep this perennial in a sunken pot to control its tendency to run rampant in my rich soil. For years, its blossoms were marred by a small white worm that ate the blossoms from the inside out. I had no flowers despite trying hard to hand pick the pests once they showed themselves. I nearly gave up. Lately I have been pinching out the tips of each stalk early in the season, delaying flowering and thereby circumventing the appearance of the pests and achieving flowers a bit later than usual. I like the color and the fragrance, but it's not an easy plant.

Positive

On Jul 4, 2011, HamptonsGardener from East Hampton, NY wrote:

The blooms look good this year due to all the rain.Definitely does best in a moist, sunny site. Make sure to mix with other perennials so something carries the planting after the Monardas fade out. I planted among cone flowers, butterfly bush and daylilies.

Jeff (hamptonsgarden.blogspot.com)

Neutral

On Jun 4, 2011, BUFFY690 from Prosperity, SC (Zone 7b) wrote:

I fell in love love love with this plant at work, I don't even have to bend down to appreciate this awesome bloom...LOL...I am adding it into my full sun area tomorrow in hope that it will just do its thang and reward me with awesome flowers and return power.

Positive

On Jul 1, 2010, themikeman from Concord, NC (Zone 7a) wrote:

Raspberry wine beebalm is without a doubt the most beautiful beebalm plant ive ever had. it is not the hardiest variety as the first two years i had it,.. it was quite sickly..however it spreads more than any other variety i have including jacob's cline, and it's the most beautiful rose wine color i have in my garden, resembling my rose cleome and stare fire phlox in color..the only complaint i have is that they have become soo tall a couple have fallen over and have spread so fast after just 3 years that im gonna have to transplant a few already!! ..most beautiful monarda hands down!! mike.

Positive

On Jun 13, 2010, shortydingus from Tallahassee, FL wrote:

I planted this 3 years ago in my zone 8b garden and it has finally adapted to this area and opened the first flower after a solid week of ninety-plus degree days. It is in full sun and absolutely stunning. I give it no supplemental care.

Positive

On Nov 3, 2009, annakins from Aberdeen, SD wrote:

Absolutely love this plant. Mine gets alot of double heads on it. I pinch back the front half for longer bloom time, but really don't need to do this as it blooms for quite a while. Does get a little powdery mildew even though says resistant. Still worth growing.

Positive

On Jul 31, 2006, Ordelia from Banner Elk, NC (Zone 6a) wrote:

Say what you want about powdery mildew resistance, but Monarda Raspberry Wine grows in full sun with beautiful results, even if it is a little defoliated. A little neem oil will eliminate the powdery mildew, if applied regularly.

Negative

On Jul 12, 2006, kizilod from Uxbridge, MA wrote:

This variety of Bee Balm is supposed to be resistant to powdery mildew, but my 'Raspberry Wine' (which I planted last fall) developed some today. However, it might be my fault. I think I have it planted in a bit too much shade and I haven't kept the soil constantly moist (which is supposed to discourage powdery mildew in Monarda). I'll move it this fall if I can find a more suitable space in my garden.

Positive

On Nov 9, 2004, smiln32 from Oklahoma City, OK (Zone 7a) wrote:

This gorgeous monarda is a clump-forming perennial that has raspberry flowers with dark green aromatic foliage. The leaves of Monarda can be used for teas and in salads. Butterflies and hummingbirds are attracted to them, too.

Raspberry Wine can reach a height of 36"and has a spread of 24-36. It blooms from July to August. It prefers partial sun.