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PlantFiles: Snow on the Mountain
Euphorbia marginata 'Kilimanjaro'

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Family: Euphorbiaceae (yoo-for-bee-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Euphorbia (yoo-FOR-bee-uh) (Info)
Species: marginata (mar-jen-AY-tuh) (Info)
Cultivar: Kilimanjaro

One vendor has this plant for sale.

12 members have or want this plant for trade.

Category:
Annuals

Height:
18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

Spacing:
18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

Hardiness:
Not Applicable

Sun Exposure:
Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:
All parts of plant are poisonous if ingested
Handling plant may cause skin irritation or allergic reaction

Bloom Color:
Pale Green
White/Near White

Bloom Time:
Mid Summer
Late Summer/Early Fall
Mid Fall

Foliage:
Grown for foliage

Other details:
Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:
6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)
6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)
7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:
Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:
From seed; direct sow outdoors in fall
From seed; direct sow after last frost

Seed Collecting:
Allow seedheads to dry on plants; remove and collect seeds

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By Happenstance
Thumbnail #1 of Euphorbia marginata by Happenstance

By Happenstance
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By kbaumle
Thumbnail #3 of Euphorbia marginata by kbaumle

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Thumbnail #4 of Euphorbia marginata by begoniacrazii

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By begoniacrazii
Thumbnail #6 of Euphorbia marginata by begoniacrazii

By Kell
Thumbnail #7 of Euphorbia marginata by Kell

There are a total of 14 photos.
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Profile:

3 positives
1 neutral
No negatives

Gardeners' Notes:

RatingAuthorContent
Positive sisdj On Sep 2, 2005, sisdj from Dayton, TN (Zone 7a) wrote:

I planted this from seed while living in zone 5, Indiana and it grew 5-6 ft tall the first year and bushy and had to be staked. I moved from there in Sept that year and my sister pulled up a piece and just stuck it in the ground in Tennessee zone 7. It reseeded itself for her and the next year she had it everywhere. I was back in Indiana this past week, 2yrs later and the plant has also reseeded and survived Cold, windy, icy winters!! I love it and hope it stays forever.

Neutral LukesMom On Aug 5, 2004, LukesMom from Oak Lawn, IL wrote:

I was at a Farmer's Market this week (in Chicago) and there was some cut snow on the mountain euphorbia that they were selling in bunches. I mentioned that this was one euphorbia variety that I had been searching for in my garden. She told me that it is an annual. I am in Zone 5 and I have seen it in a neighborhood yard year after year and I can't imagine this lady plants it every year. I would love to know where to buy one.
LukesMom

Positive bears15 On Aug 25, 2003, bears15 from Platte Center, NE (Zone 5b) wrote:

It is hardy to zone 5, grows in nearby ditches and pastures. Soil where it is growing is mostly sand.
Drought tolerant.

Positive ArianesGrandma On Sep 11, 2002, ArianesGrandma from Yorkville, IL (Zone 5b) wrote:

Excellent Specimen Plant...It speaks for itself! Looks Great next to Diablo Ninebark!

Regional...

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Jáltipan De Morelos,
Calistoga, California
Clayton, California
Hemet, California
Long Beach, California
San Leandro, California
Dunnellon, Florida
Lenox, Massachusetts
Silver Creek, Nebraska
Astoria, New York
Haviland, Ohio
West Union, Ohio
Wilkes Barre, Pennsylvania
Dayton, Tennessee
Arlington, Texas



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