Darwin Hybrid Tulip
Tulipa 'Olympic Flame'

Family: Liliaceae (lil-ee-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Tulipa (TOO-li-pa) (Info)
Cultivar: Olympic Flame
Hybridized by A. Verschoor Jr.
Registered or introduced: 1971
» View all varieties of Tulips

Division:

Division 4 - Darwin Hybrids

Height:

18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

Spacing:

3-6 in. (7-15 cm)

6-9 in. (15-22 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 3a: to -39.9 C (-40 F)

USDA Zone 3b: to -37.2 C (-35 F)

USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 C (-30 F)

USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 C (-25 F)

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Danger:

Parts of plant are poisonous if ingested

Handling plant may cause skin irritation or allergic reaction

Bloom Color:

Red

Bright Yellow

Bloom Time:

Mid Spring

Late Spring/Early Summer

Foliage:

Blue-Green

Smooth-Textured

Other details:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Flowers are good for cutting

Soil pH requirements:

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

By dividing rhizomes, tubers, corms or bulbs (including offsets)

Seed Collecting:

N/A: plant does not set seed, flowers are sterile, or plants will not come true from seed

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

San Francisco, California

Clifton, Colorado

Washington, Illinois

Brunswick, Missouri

Toledo, Ohio

, Ontario

Norristown, Pennsylvania

Wilkes Barre, Pennsylvania

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Gardeners' Notes:

4
positives
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Apr 16, 2014, zwerfkei from Deventer
Netherlands wrote:

The page mentions this Tulip was hybridised by A.Verschoor.

Ik am sure this is not right. It was hybridised by my own grandfather, J.H.Clement. He was a tulip farmer and dealer and did hybridisation as a side business. He spent many years developing a good hybride, and when he got one tulip selected, he spent many years after that multiplying it. You can imagine how many years it would take to get a field from 1 single tulip.

But, as things go, our tulips standing just in the open field along the road in Voorhout, near Lisse in the Netherlands, they were open to everyone, and some got stolen. Later these were multiplied by others, which i once discovered when i saw a field of them nearby, but not owned by our company. So it went, but give the real man th... read more

Neutral

On May 21, 2007, saya from Heerlen
Netherlands (Zone 8b) wrote:

Breeder/hybridizer: A. Verschoor Jr.,1971. Sport of Olympic gold.

Positive

On Apr 14, 2006, ineedacupoftea from Denver, CO wrote:

A very tall, robust, round-shaped tulip.
Unsurpassed for cutflower use, but not of a pleasant odor. Flowers first open with some red flaming, but mature with up to 30% red coverage, mostly on the interior. A good neighbor to Fritillaria imperialis. Good perennialization quality, not overly fussy.

Positive

On Apr 1, 2003, Kelli from L.A. (Canoga Park), CA (Zone 10a) wrote:

This is one of my favorites, too. In this climate, tulips have to be refrigerated before planting, since the "winter" isn't cold enough to get them to bloom on their own. Thus, tulips are usually considered "annuals", to be discarded after the bloom is over. However, I have dug up and re-refrigerated my "Olympic Flame" tulips and they have bloomed several years in a row.

Positive

On Mar 31, 2003, Bug_Girl from San Francisco, CA wrote:

This is my most successful tulip. I have been growing it for years, and it just keeps coming back and blooming every year. I bought some new Olympic Flame bulbs and they did better then the other darwin hybrids, which I was growing.