Twinleaf
Jeffersonia dubia

Family: Berberidaceae (bear-ber-id-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Jeffersonia (Jefferson-ee-a) (Info)
Species: dubia (DOO-bee-uh) (Info)
Synonym:Plagiorhegma dubia

Category:

Perennials

Height:

6-12 in. (15-30 cm)

Spacing:

Unknown - Tell us

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 3a: to -39.9 °C (-40 °F)

Sun Exposure:

Light Shade

Partial to Full Shade

Full Shade

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Light Blue

Violet/Lavender

Bloom Time:

Mid Spring

Foliage:

Herbaceous

Other details:

Requires consistently moist soil; do not let dry out between waterings

Soil pH requirements:

5.1 to 5.5 (strongly acidic)

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

Unknown - Tell us

Seed Collecting:

Seed does not store well; sow as soon as possible

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

,

Sittingbourne,

Shelburne Falls, Massachusetts

Eveleth, Minnesota

Saint Cloud, Minnesota

Saint Louis, Missouri

Voorheesville, New York

Wilkes Barre, Pennsylvania

De Pere, Wisconsin

show all

Gardeners' Notes:

2
positives
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On Jun 2, 2015, altagardener from Calgary, AB (Zone 3b) wrote:

It does not appear to be fussy about soil pH, as it seems to grow very well here in alkaline soil (pH 8); hardy down to at least zone 3 and long-lived.

Positive

On May 5, 2014, coriaceous from ROSLINDALE, MA wrote:

A beautiful spring woodland wildflower for acid soil. Flowers can be medium blue-violet, very fleeting. Leaves are lovely. Goes dormant in late spring.

I find it easy to please. Self-sows.

Jeffersonia do not lend themselves to division, and are propagated by seed.

Positive

On Apr 21, 2003, philomel from Castelnau RB Pyrenées
France (Zone 8a) wrote:

This is an exquisite little woodland plant from Japan.
It likes humus rich, acidic soil in a shady place with plenty of leaf mould that is not allowed to dry out and are recommended for growing in a peat bed as they resent disturbance and should not have other plants encroaching upon them.
Propogation is best from seed, which should be gathered and sown as soon as ripe.
The flowers appear when the leaves are only half unfurled. Thes leaves are purple-tinged while developing, but become green after the flowers are shed.
The whole effect is very pleasing.
There is also a white flowered form.