Hybrid Tea Rose 'King's Ransom'


Family: Rosaceae (ro-ZAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Rosa (RO-zuh) (Info)
Cultivar: King's Ransom
Additional cultivar information:(PP2103)
Hybridized by Morey
Registered or introduced: 1961
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Hybrid Tea


24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

36-48 in. (90-120 cm)

4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)


36-48 in. (90-120 cm)


USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Bloom Color:

Deep yellow (dy)

Bloom Shape:

Tea shaped

Flower Fragrance:

No fragrance

Bloom Time:

Mid Spring

Blooms repeatedly



Patent Information:

Patent expired

Other Details:

Stems are very thorny

Pruning Instructions:

Blooms on new wood; prune early to promote new growth

Soil pH requirements:

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

Propagation Methods:

From softwood cuttings

From semi-hardwood cuttings

From hardwood cuttings

By grafting

By budding

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

Flowers are good for cutting

Flowers are fragrant

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us


This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Quartz Hill, California

Roseville, California

Villa Rica, Georgia

Deridder, Louisiana

Perrysburg, Ohio

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

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Gardeners' Notes:


On Dec 17, 2010, tgwWhale from Casco, WI wrote:

I had a King's Ransom for several years. I am always trying to find yellow hybrid teas that can be made to survive our NE Wisconsin winters (zone 5). This one, if buried in ground, would survive, but only the very bottom of a few of the stems would be alive when the plant was unburied int he spring.

My particular King's Ransom had a poor growth habit in that the stems were commonly not strong enough to hold the bloom up, and so the flowers would droop and not look good either on the plant or in a vase.


On Jul 6, 2010, Glenn3 from Camden, ME wrote:

Nice yellow Hybrid Tea, but it won't winter over in Maine.


On Oct 18, 2009, Joan from Belfield, ND (Zone 4a) wrote:

Editor's Note

Plant Patent number 2103 has expired