Willow-leaved Hakea
Hakea salicifolia

Family: Proteaceae (pro-tee-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Hakea (HAK-ee-uh) (Info)
Species: salicifolia (sal-iss-ih-FOH-lee-uh) (Info)

Category:

Shrubs

Trees

Height:

12-15 ft. (3.6-4.7 m)

Spacing:

Unknown - Tell us

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

Sun Exposure:

Sun to Partial Shade

Light Shade

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Cream/Tan

Bloom Time:

Mid Spring

Foliage:

Blue-Green

Other details:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

Unknown - Tell us

Seed Collecting:

Collect seedhead/pod when flowers fade; allow to dry

Properly cleaned, seed can be successfully stored

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Dublin, California

Spring Valley, California

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Jun 10, 2003, kennedyh from Churchill, Victoria
Australia (Zone 10a) wrote:

This is a large shrub to small tree, growing in the coastal regions of New South Wales in Australia.I have two in my garden which I grew from seed. Like most Hakeas, the seed capsules are large woody pods, which contain two winged seeds. They are strongly adapted to fire and the seed is mostly retained on the shrub until the shrub is killed or damaged by fire. The thick pods protect the seed, which is then shed a few days after the fire, when they germinate very readily as soon as there is enough moisture.
If pods are picked, they usually open in a few days and the seed are usually easy to germinate. The flowers are very numerous in clusters in the leaf axils and have a light scent.
Both shrubs in our garden have now grown to about 4 metres high and have proved a popular foo... read more