Photo by Melody

PlantFiles: Miracle Fruit, Miracle Berry
Synsepalum dulcificum

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Family: Sapotaceae
Genus: Synsepalum (sin-SEP-al-lum) (Info)
Species: dulcificum (dul-SIF-ih-kum) (Info)

3 vendors have this plant for sale.

103 members have or want this plant for trade.

Category:
Edible Fruits and Nuts
Shrubs
Tropicals and Tender Perennials

Height:
10-12 ft. (3-3.6 m)

Spacing:
Unknown - Tell us

Hardiness:
USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)
USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Sun Exposure:
Full Sun
Sun to Partial Shade
Light Shade

Danger:
N/A

Bloom Color:
White/Near White
Inconspicuous/none

Bloom Time:
Blooms all year
Blooms repeatedly

Foliage:
Evergreen

Other details:
This plant is suitable for growing indoors

Soil pH requirements:
4.5 or below (very acidic)
4.6 to 5.0 (highly acidic)
5.1 to 5.5 (strongly acidic)
5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

Patent Information:
Non-patented

Propagation Methods:
From seed; germinate in a damp paper towel
By air layering

Seed Collecting:
Seed does not store well; sow as soon as possible

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to view:

By IslandJim
Thumbnail #1 of Synsepalum dulcificum by IslandJim

By teddyJ
Thumbnail #2 of Synsepalum dulcificum by teddyJ

By teddyJ
Thumbnail #3 of Synsepalum dulcificum by teddyJ

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By fauna4flora
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By fauna4flora
Thumbnail #7 of Synsepalum dulcificum by fauna4flora

Profile:

10 positives
3 neutrals
1 negative

Gardeners' Notes:

RatingAuthorContent
Positive Enri312 On Jul 3, 2014, Enri312 from Corona, CA (Zone 9b) wrote:

I bought this plant twice from someone on ebay for about $17 each. The first time around, it died indoors during the winter.

I bought a second one and it also started to die until I discovered that peat moss contains no nutrition. The plant kept outgrowing it's container so I tranplanted it into a 3 gallon pot with a mix of sphagnum peat and fertilized potting soil. I use to water with fish emulsion and kelp but later ended up using a 10-10-10 slow realease granular fertilizer for simplicity. I brought the plant indoors during the winter.

This plant hates tap water and loves distilled drinking water, like the kind you fill up with in those large 5 gallon water bottles. I leave a plastic watering can outside with drinking water and water the plant occasionally. The leaves have stopped browning at the edges. This plant does prefer partial shade. I hear that they produce fruit in 5 years.

Positive pniksch On Jul 29, 2013, pniksch from Frisco, TX (Zone 8a) wrote:

Got mine in a 4" pot from Logee's- the plant was about a foot tall, and came with mealybug on it, which was easy to control, and I've never had any since (I'm guessing it came from an 'outbreak' in their greenhouse). Easy plant to grow, which I do in a pot here in zone 8a. It had fruit the first full year I had it, when it was about 18" tall, although it only produced a small handful of seeds/fruits the first season. The 'fruit' are actually small seeds covered by a thin, sweet covering, kind of like coffee 'beans', for those of you that have grown them, except there is only 1 seed per fruit. Works as advertised- eat a Miracle Fruit, then pop a lemon slice in your boca and sure enough, it tastes like a sweet lemonade explosion!

Positive Plancton On Apr 5, 2013, Plancton from zones 10 to 11
United States wrote:

I do have a 14 (yes) 14 feet tree. I have done cuttings and germinated 100s of them. For germination fresh seeds is key, for cuttings .03% gives 60% (only done like 10 cuttings as it hurts me to prune this small tree). I don't understand why they say here that the fruit has no taste, I do think it does taste pretty good but hard to describe the taste. When you have lots of them you can splurge and use them in your jar of lemon juice with water and it will really taste like lemonade. This tree has a very very hard wood as well and it seems to not have any pests. Birds pick on them when the tree is full and the seeds are starting to get ripe, but not like with my Morus nigra trees. kittycat2, I've heard that most of these trees need at least 2 feet to hold the fruits on the tree.... check if by any chance you have some cream ovals that come of the tips... that is the start of the flowers. It might be because of the size or maybe a nutrient deficiency.... it takes 5 years for a tress to fruit from seed on average.

Negative kittycat2 On Jan 17, 2013, kittycat2 from Moss Point, MS wrote:

I have had this plant growing for 2 years. It has never made any fruit, nor has it bloomed. Seems to be growing just fine, just has never produced like it was promoted. How long does it take to produce? Mine is a bushy 18 in. plant grown in an appropriate sized pot in partial shade, acid soil, and is protected from freeze.

Positive Linda777 On May 22, 2011, Linda777 from Cape Coral, FL wrote:

I grow this on the lanai in morning sun. When I start seeing buds I place it outside in a bright location for insect pollination. The berries are starting to ripen. I'll will bring it back in before the rainy season starts. It's such a fun and pretty plant!

Positive Rawmodel On Aug 23, 2009, Rawmodel from Alexandria, MN wrote:

I bought this plant from a nursery in Miami Fl, and started getting berries about a month afterwards..truly an amazing experience.

I left my plant with a friend while traveling, and returned yesterday to find that squirrels devoured the entire plant. Down to the nub. Be vary wary of these animals...keep a good eye on your tree for any nibbling.

Im ordering another tomorrow because this is such a great plant to have inside and the berries sell for $7 each in NY.

Positive miraclefruithut On Jul 9, 2008, miraclefruithut from Bear, DE wrote:

Hello,
We are looking to buy seeds, plants, granules, etc. Please get back to me via dmail

Thanks

Neutral TheGardenerGirl On May 30, 2008, TheGardenerGirl from Trabuco Canyon, CA (Zone 10a) wrote:

Where can one buy the plant? Is it invasive? Can it be used as a hedge?

Neutral lcosden On Jul 11, 2007, lcosden from Pawling, NY (Zone 5b) wrote:

I got a plant in May (yes one for my mom and one for myself... she still got her mothers day present). My little plant is okay, seems healthy but no new leaves or anything.

Positive mrlab1234 On Jul 12, 2004, mrlab1234 from Surrey, British Columbia
Canada wrote:

WE LIVE IN THE GREATER VANCOUVER AREA IN THE PROVICE BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA AND ABOUT 12 YEARS AGO WE WERE GIVEN A BRANCH FROM ONE OF THESE TREES IN LATE SEPTEMBER AND STUCK IT IN THE GROUND. THE FOLLOWING YEAR THE TREE HAD ROOTED AND STARTED TO PRODUCE FRUIT. I TOOK A FEW CUTTINGS THE NEXT YEAR AND STUCK THEM IN THE GROUND AND THEY ALSO ROOTED AND PRODUCED FRUIT THE FOLLOWING YEAR. I HAVE STARTED A FEW TREES FOR FRIENDS AND HAVE GIVEN A COUPLE OF THEM AWAY.

AT PRESENT WE HAVE 4 TREES AND THIS YEAR HAVE BEEN ABLE TO PICK AT LEAST 8 ICECREAM BUCKETS OF THE FRUIT. IF YOU LEAVE THE FRUIT ON THE TREE THE BERRIES START TO DRY AND START TO LOOK ALMOST LIKE A RAISIN AND IF YOU PICK AND EAT THEM THIS WAY, THEY BECOME QUITE SWEET.

I FEEL THAT WITH A LITTLE WORK, I CAN MAKE A MARINADE FOR COOKING AND WILL SEE IF I CAN COME UP WITH SOMETHING THAT MAY TASTE QUITE GOOD!!! IF I DO, I WILL UPDATE SOME INFORMATION IN THE FUTURE!!

Neutral japanman On May 12, 2004, japanman from yokohama
wrote:

Hey for all of you growing the miracle fruit.. I live in yokohama, Japan and I just wanted to let you know that they are starting to import it here and its serious money. ONE berry goes for 1000 yen, or like 10 US dollars. So if youre growin em, you gotta find a way to send it over here haha, maybe we can work something out.

Positive jarhead On Feb 19, 2004, jarhead wrote:

My piers and I have been growing miracle fruit among several other tropical and subtropical plants in northern New Mexico. One of our greenhouses (we call them biolariums) had a severe freeze (-10 f). Many plants & trees didn't make it, but interesting enough we had a few that did. And others recovered with a bit of time. Our miracle fruit was one of the overcommers. A few leaves did freeze but have grown back fully! We are now after 6 weeks begining to see it flowering once again.

Positive IslandJim On Jul 12, 2003, IslandJim from Keizer, OR (Zone 8b) wrote:

The miracle fruit shown in the picture I posted is growing and thriving in pure shredded pine bark--about as acid as a planting medium can get.

Positive teddyJ On Jun 12, 2003, teddyJ from Rockhampton
Australia wrote:

In order to produce fruit the soil must be acid. A small taste of the fruit will result, after a short while, in a change in your taste buds. The more sour things are the sweeter they will seem. Lemons and even vinegar will taste sweet once the miracle fruit has done its work on your tongue. That's why it's called the 'Miracle Fruit'

Regional...

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Corona, California
Goleta, California
Mountain View, California
Simi Valley, California
Tulare, California
Farmington, Connecticut
Bear, Delaware
Bartow, Florida
Boca Raton, Florida
Bradenton, Florida
Brandon, Florida
Cape Coral, Florida
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
Homestead, Florida
Ocala, Florida
Ocoee, Florida
Orlando, Florida (2 reports)
Palmetto, Florida
Saint Petersburg, Florida
Sarasota, Florida
Venice, Florida
West Palm Beach, Florida
Winter Park, Florida
Honomu, Hawaii
Brooklyn, New York
Burton, Texas
Frisco, Texas
Houston, Texas (2 reports)
Katy, Texas
Manvel, Texas



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