Sweet Cudweed, Old-Field Balsam, Life-Everlasting, Rabbit Tobacco, Indian Posy, Cat's Foot
Pseudognaphalium obtusifolium

Family: Asteraceae (ass-ter-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Pseudognaphalium (soo-doh-naf-FAY-lee-um) (Info)
Species: obtusifolium (ob-too-sih-FOH-lee-um) (Info)
Synonym:Gnaphalium polycephalum
Synonym:Gnaphalium obtusifolium

Category:

Annuals

Foliage Color:

Silver/Gray

Blue-Green

Bloom Characteristics:

Flowers are fragrant

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

12-18 in. (30-45 cm)

18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

Spacing:

Unknown - Tell us

Hardiness:

Not Applicable

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

White/Near White

Bloom Time:

Late Summer/Early Fall

Mid Fall

Foliage:

Aromatic

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

Unknown - Tell us

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Dyer, Arkansas

Morrilton, Arkansas

Mount Dora, Florida

Winter Haven, Florida

Merryville, Louisiana

Oakland, Maryland

Cole Camp, Missouri

Thayer, Missouri

Bessemer City, North Carolina

Allentown, Pennsylvania

Arlington, Texas

show all

Gardeners' Notes:

2
positives
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Jun 29, 2012, wakingdream from Allentown, PA wrote:

This strange new plant appeared in my garden after I had lived here 20 years. Researching it revealed the name Catfoot. It behaves as a biennial in zone 6 southeastern PA. It grew to 2 feet in height and was quite attractive for many months. At first I was impatient to see what all the tight little buds would open into, but I finally realized they themselves were the show.

The year one basal rosette resembles Lamb's Ear or Lychnis at first glance. I grew some in winter jugs in 2011 and they took readily. The stems are quite pale and blossoms resemble the toes of a cat.

The other common name of 'Sweet Everlasting' is also appropriate.

Positive

On Feb 5, 2008, frostweed from Josephine, Arlington, TX (Zone 8a) wrote:

Sweet Cudweed, Old-Field Balsam, Life-Everlasting, Rabbit Tobacco, Indian Posy, Cat's Foot Gnaphalium obtusifolium, is native to Texas and other States, and is a larval host for the Painted Lady butterfly.

Neutral

On Feb 16, 2006, raisedbedbob from Walkerton, VA (Zone 7a) wrote:

The leaves and flowers (chewed or in tea) were traditionally used to treat sore throat, pneumonia, colds, fevers, upset stomach, abdominal cramps, asthma, flu, coughs, rheumatism, bowel disorders, mouth ulcers, hemorrage, and tumors. Was also used as a mild nerve sedative, diuretic, and antispasmotic. The fresh juice was considered an aphrodisiac.