Small Grass-tree, Snake Charmer
Xanthorrhoea minor

Family: Xanthorrhoeaceae
Genus: Xanthorrhoea (zan-thor-ROH-ee-uh) (Info)
Species: minor (MY-nor) (Info)

Category:

Perennials

Height:

12-18 in. (30-45 cm)

6-8 ft. (1.8-2.4 m)

Spacing:

Unknown - Tell us

Hardiness:

Unknown - Tell us

Sun Exposure:

Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

White/Near White

Bloom Time:

Mid Spring

Foliage:

Evergreen

Other details:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Flowers are fragrant

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

Unknown - Tell us

Seed Collecting:

Allow pods to dry on plant; break open to collect seeds

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Jul 9, 2003, kennedyh from Churchill, Victoria
Australia (Zone 10a) wrote:

This is the little cousin of the Australian grass-trees. It never develops a woody stem, but the tuft of grass-like leaves sits on the ground. Like its larger cousins, it puts up a tall slender flower spike, which increases the height of the plant from under a metre to occasionally over two metres. The flowers have a strong scent of honey and are attractive to bees and nectar-feeding birds. Unlike the larger grass-trees, this species is not limited to a single flower spike and multiple flower spikes are fairly common. These sometimes twist round each other as they ascend and this leads to the common name of Snake Charmer as the intertwined flower stems suggest snakes twisting together.
In Morwell National Park, the largest plants of the Tall Greenhood orchid grow up through the clum... read more