Crowberry, Black Crowberry, Curlewberry
Empetrum nigrum

Family: Ericaceae (er-ek-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Empetrum (EM-pe-trum) (Info)
Species: nigrum (NY-grum) (Info)
Synonym:Chamaetaxus nigra
Synonym:Empetrum crassifolium
Synonym:Empetrum medium
Synonym:Empetrum procumbens
Synonym:Empetrum scoticum

Category:

Edible Fruits and Nuts

Shrubs

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant; suitable for xeriscaping

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

under 6 in. (15 cm)

Spacing:

Unknown - Tell us

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 2a: to -45.5 C (-50 F)

USDA Zone 2b: to -42.7 C (-45 F)

USDA Zone 3a: to -39.9 C (-40 F)

USDA Zone 3b: to -37.2 C (-35 F)

USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 C (-30 F)

USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 C (-25 F)

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:

Parts of plant are poisonous if ingested

Bloom Color:

Purple

Bloom Time:

Mid Spring

Late Spring/Early Summer

Mid Summer

Foliage:

Evergreen

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

4.5 or below (very acidic)

4.6 to 5.0 (highly acidic)

5.1 to 5.5 (strongly acidic)

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From woody stem cuttings

Seed Collecting:

N/A: plant does not set seed, flowers are sterile, or plants will not come true from seed

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Saint Paul, Minnesota

Gardeners' Notes:

0
positives
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On Dec 15, 2004, Todd_Boland from St. John's, NL (Zone 5b) wrote:

This plant looks much like a prostrate Erica and requires similar growing conditions; moist, peaty, acidic soil and full sun. The flowers are nearly microscopic but they develop into jet-black berries in mid-summer. The summer foliage is dark green and the leaves are fragrant when crushed. In winter, plants often turn purplish. It is very common in Newfoundland, growing along the coast and rocky barrenland areas.