White Floss Silk Tree

Ceiba insignis

Family: Bombacaceae
Genus: Ceiba (SAY-buh) (Info)
Species: insignis (in-SIG-nis) (Info)
Synonym:Chorisia insignis



Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant; suitable for xeriscaping

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us


over 40 ft. (12 m)


30-40 ft. (9-12 m)


USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade


Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Pale Yellow

White/Near White

Bloom Time:

Late Summer/Early Fall

Mid Fall

Late Fall/Early Winter

Mid Winter




Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

From seed; stratify if sowing indoors

From seed; germinate in a damp paper towel

From seed; germinate in vitro in gelatin, agar or other medium

By air layering

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us


This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:


Scottsdale, Arizona

Arcadia, California

Bostonia, California

Encino, California

Spring Valley, California

Thousand Oaks, California

Bartow, Florida

Bradley, Florida

Fort Pierce, Florida

Groveland, Florida

Lakeland, Florida

Miami, Florida

North Fort Myers, Florida

Port Richey, Florida

Sanford, Florida

Tampa, Florida

Houston, Texas

show all

Gardeners' Notes:


On Feb 10, 2006, PCVTX8b from Houston, TX (Zone 9a) wrote:

I have been able to baby this plant in my zone (9a), but it has taken a couple of hits and lost the lead trunk. There are a few spikes on the remaining trunk and small ones on the main limbs. I get a fantastic showing of white flowers in late October.


On Mar 15, 2005, plantluver123 from Lacey, WA wrote:

if anyone has a couple of seeds that they could give to me. i really love this tree. in my opinion its pretty.


On Feb 4, 2005, bubsgarden from Miami, FL (Zone 11) wrote:

This is a great plant- if you want a wierdo, that is! It does not have dense foliage; actually hardly any leaves at all, and is grown for clusters of 1/4"-2" thorns on a bright green trunk. I have been personally trying to find a small one of these to grow in my garden, and I recommend it for a place in the garden in need of a eye-catching tree, but where shade is not necessary. Definately a POSITIIVE!


On Jul 22, 2003, palmbob from Acton, CA (Zone 8b) wrote:

Like its more popular cousin, the pink Floss Silk Tree, this one has a green and variably spiny trunk. This species almost always has a very spiny trunk, while you can find many C speciosas with smooth green trunks. C insignis also tends to 'bottle-up' more than the other species (see photos). It is commonly used in xeriscaping as a bizzare interest point.