Triangle Palm
Dypsis decaryi

Family: Arecaceae (ar-ek-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Dypsis (DIP-sis) (Info)
Species: decaryi (de-KAR-yee) (Info)
Synonym:Neodypsis decaryi

Category:

Trees

Tropicals and Tender Perennials

Height:

15-20 ft. (4.7-6 m)

Spacing:

15-20 ft. (4.7-6 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:

Seed is poisonous if ingested

Parts of plant are poisonous if ingested

Bloom Color:

Chartreuse (Yellow-Green)

Bloom Time:

Blooms all year

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Blue-Green

Other details:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

Direct sow as soon as the ground can be worked

From seed; germinate in vitro in gelatin, agar or other medium

Seed Collecting:

Allow unblemished fruit to ripen; clean and dry seeds

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Grenoble,

Jasper, Alabama

Orange Beach, Alabama

Mesa, Arizona

Phoenix, Arizona

Sahuarita, Arizona

Cardiff By The Sea, California

Corona, California

Encino, California

Hayward, California

Livermore, California

Los Altos, California

Oceanside, California

Rancho Cucamonga, California

Reseda, California

Santa Barbara, California (2 reports)

Simi Valley, California

Spring Valley, California

Upland, California

Ventura, California

Westlake Village, California

Whittier, California

Yorba Linda, California

Big Pine Key, Florida

Boca Raton, Florida

Bradenton, Florida

Brandon, Florida

Cape Coral, Florida (5 reports)

Cocoa, Florida

Cocoa Beach, Florida

Miami Beach, Florida

North Fort Myers, Florida

Port Charlotte, Florida

Rockledge, Florida

Saint Cloud, Florida

Saint Petersburg, Florida (2 reports)

Tampa, Florida

Venice, Florida

Vero Beach, Florida

West Palm Beach, Florida

Agana Heights, Guam

Hawaiian Ocean View, Hawaii

Kihei, Hawaii

New Orleans, Louisiana

St John, Mississippi

Bayamon, Puerto Rico

Vieques, Puerto Rico

Brownsville, Texas

Fort Worth, Texas

Galveston, Texas (2 reports)

Houston, Texas

League City, Texas

Mcallen, Texas

Rockport, Texas

St John, Virgin Islands

show all

Gardeners' Notes:

10
positives
4
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On May 18, 2014, Laura7522 from Cape Coral, FL wrote:

I stopped by my local Lowes in SW Florida and saw this palm tree. I had never seen it before, but thought it was beautiful. I looked at the tag and saw its name "triangle palm." I was driving home that same day and saw two of my neighbors have this palm tree. They seem to be doing well in their yard. It apparently does well in this area near Cape Coral, FL. I bought two of them and hope they do well in my yard too. My yard is very sandy. I'm keeping my fingers crossed.

Neutral

On Aug 4, 2013, imagerep from Westlake Village, CA wrote:

We have two on our property. Beautiful palm but frustrating for us to grow due to winter frost sets them back each year. We'll get several nights during winter with 25-28F and frawns will burn.

Positive

On Mar 19, 2012, johnchen99 from Livermore, CA wrote:

Easy to grow with some protection under large trees in Livermore, CA.

Positive

On Sep 19, 2010, AZJeff from Sahuarita, AZ (Zone 9a) wrote:

I ordered these Triangle palm seeds from a seed company along with other types of palms. I have 3 just starting to sprout. I planted them on Aug.1st and the 1st one came up on 9/15/10. I don't know how they will grow in southern AZ but I will give it a try. I plan to keep them as protected patio plants in pots for now. I've never seen anyone growing them in this area. To me the palm resembles a strange date palm from a distance or date palm crossed with a Travelers tree. The thing that really interests me about it,is they say the trunk is like 3 sided like a triangle,hence it's name. The sprouts on mine are of course like little spears,green with small black spots on them. I hope this isn't like a "feather frond" palm,as those types don't do well in this region,due to our extreme hot su... read more

Positive

On Jun 25, 2010, liss52 from Ocean View, HI wrote:

Triangle palms are growing abundantly on the Big Island of Hawaii despite the current, long drought we are having.

Neutral

On Feb 26, 2010, HK22 from Sydney
Australia wrote:

Not one of my favorite palms, it usually looks tatted here in the Sydney region (Australia), and I have never really seen a nice one. But for an exotic palm, this is a good choice anyway.

Neutral

On Sep 1, 2009, lynnkenton from Ventura, CA wrote:

My friend has a beutiful specimen in her yard here in Ventura, CA. I ordered seeds from Whatcom Seed Co. and germinated them.(took 3 mos.). How deep do we plant them now that they're going into pots?

Positive

On May 11, 2009, neatoplantguy from Saint Petersburg, FL wrote:

I have had great success at growing these palms from seed in Fl. I have a nice crop of year and a half old babies, out of all of them one is extremely gold colored with pink instead of the deep red the other palms have. It is just as healthy and growing at the same rate, same soil and same mother plant. If anyone has had the same experience I would like to find out more.

Positive

On Jul 15, 2008, shanephxaz from Phoenix, AZ wrote:

Having no knowledge of this palm before purchasing back in summer of '07, I had no idea that that winter would end up being the coldest in 35 years! all the mature fronds on it died, except the newest shoot. I was devastated! Somehow, miraculously, it made it. And it's a beautiful specimen once more. taking center stage in my courtyard. getting afternoon shade only, under 4 huge washingtonia palms and a date palm. highly recommended, but for sheltered locations only.

Positive

On Jun 21, 2007, 208va from Fort Worth, TX wrote:

THE PLANT WAS PURCHASED IN ROCKPORT, TX, ON THE TEXAS COAST. I LIVE IN ZONE 7, ABOUT 350 MILES NORTH OF THE TEXAS COAST, SO I KEEP THE PALM IN A CONTAINER AND BRING INSIDE IN WINTER. iT SEEMS TO THRIVE IN PART SUN AND MODERATE WATER, SOME WELL BALANCED FERTILIZER KEEPS NEW GROWTH FORMING. BEAUTIFUL PLANT.

Positive

On Jan 27, 2006, deezpalms from Oceanside, CA (Zone 10b) wrote:

The Triangle palms grows great in southern california but does alot better inland then it does on the coast. Even with a perfect fertilizer diet including all micro nutrients and trace elements it can be difficult to get this palm to look its best without a great amount of heat and sun. Don't get me wrong, here in my coastal garden the tree does great and looks very beautiful however the difference is much like a car. If you wash your car it looks great but if you wax it it looks even better!

Positive

On Nov 18, 2005, GernBlandston from Lake Elsinore, CA (Zone 9b) wrote:

I'm growing five triangle palms along the top of a five-foot slope in zone 9b. They survived a little snow that lasted several hours last winter (2004), with negligible damage. They are growing in full sun and get watered sparingly by drip irrigation. They are beautiful trees!

Positive

On Dec 29, 2003, laspalmasdesign from Los Altos, CA wrote:

An easy to grow and unusual looking palm. I have several in my yard in partial to full shade and all are doing well here in the SF Bay Area. Mine seem to like lots of water despite what some say about them being better off on the dry side. My soil is a clay loam mix. These palms have become very easy to come by. I recently bought a beautiful 6' tall trunking one in a 15 gal. container at the Home Depot for $39.90.

Positive

On Jul 23, 2003, palmbob from Acton, CA (Zone 8b) wrote:

This is quickly becoming a popular avenue palm in Southern California, in the warmer areas (gets burnt by frosts)- a native of Madagascar. It's called the triangle palm because it grows its leaves in three ranks (tristichous) just like a triangle from above. The crownshaft (not a true crownshaft) has a unique look that is very ornamental, sort of like a pagoda, and is covered with dark, maroon fuzz. THe leaves are a blue-green. This plant is one of the more drought tolerant Madagascan palms, and resents too much water, especially in poorly draining soils. This also is a very difficult to move when large, having very sensitive roots that tend to die off if manipulated.