Noni, Indian Mulberry, Cheese Fruit, Wild Pine, Hog Apple
Morinda citrifolia

Family: Rubiaceae
Genus: Morinda (mo-RIN-duh) (Info)
Species: citrifolia (sit-rih-FOH-lee-uh) (Info)

Category:

Edible Fruits and Nuts

Foliage Color:

Dark/Black

Bloom Characteristics:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Flowers are fragrant

Water Requirements:

Requires consistently moist soil; do not let dry out between waterings

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

15-20 ft. (4.7-6 m)

20-30 ft. (6-9 m)

Spacing:

15-20 ft. (4.7-6 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Sun Exposure:

Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

White/Near White

Bloom Time:

Blooms repeatedly

Foliage:

Evergreen

Shiny/Glossy-Textured

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

Unknown - Tell us

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Clewiston, Florida

Fort Pierce, Florida (2 reports)

Islamorada, Florida

Loxahatchee, Florida (2 reports)

Honomu, Hawaii

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Oct 29, 2004, TamsTrees from Clewiston, FL (Zone 9b) wrote:

Noni is very easy to grow but is an extremely sensitive plant. It will die with temps below 40 degrees. It takes longer to propagate by seed which is why many growers do so from cuttings; however this is a problem because the plant grows almost sideways and has a difficult time supporting the fruit. Noni should be allowed to ripen as much as possible on the tree and picked when its almost dripping so you can image how difficult this is without a strong plant/tree.
You can juice the fruit in a food processor and Ive been told that freezing doesnt hurt but fresh is always best. One fruit puts out a lot of juice so there are no way youd ever use it all.
Im growing it now and plan on feeding it to the animals here at the rescue. Of course I plan on putting it in a greenhous... read more