Sweet Crabapple, Garland Crab Apple

Malus coronaria

Family: Rosaceae (ro-ZAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Malus (MAY-lus) (Info)
Species: coronaria (kor-oh-NAR-ee-uh) (Info)
Synonym:Pyrus coronaria
» View all varieties of Apples

Height:

20-30 ft. (6-9 m)

Spacing:

20-30 ft. (6-9 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 C (-30 F)

USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 C (-25 F)

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Bloom Time:

Mid season flowering

Pollination:

Diploid

Rootstock Vigor:

Unknown - Tell us

Bearing Habit:

Unknown - Tell us

Disease Resistance:

Unknown - Tell us

Fruit Usage:

Crab

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From seed; direct sow outdoors in fall

From seed; winter sow in vented containers, coldframe or unheated greenhouse

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Flowers are fragrant

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Requires consistently moist soil; do not let dry out between waterings

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Lisle, Illinois

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Jun 25, 2015, Rickwebb from Downingtown, PA wrote:

This is one of four very similar species of native wild crabapples listed in eastern North America. It grows from NY thru IL to southern WI & MI into TN & the Carolinas. Leaves are 2 to 3" long x 1.5" wide. It bears fragrant, pinkish-white flowers about 1.5 to 2" wide in late May or early June, a little later than most crabapples. The twigs are armed with sharp spurs. The greenish-yellow fruit is larger than Oriental Crabapples, being of 1 to 1.5" in diameter, and are tart, but can be used in making jellies or jams. It is a small tree or large shrub, often growing to form thickets. Because it is very susceptible to Apple-Cedar rust Disease,(originally from East Asia), it has declined and is infrequently found in the wild. Oriental Crabapples are invading the wild from cultivation. The more... read more

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