Hybrid Tea Rose 'Heirloom'


Family: Rosaceae (ro-ZAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Rosa (RO-zuh) (Info)
Cultivar: Heirloom
Additional cultivar information:(PP3234, aka JACbloom)
Hybridized by Warriner
Registered or introduced: 1972
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Hybrid Tea


4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)


36-48 in. (90-120 cm)


USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

Bloom Color:

Mauve and mauve blend (mb)

Bloom Shape:


Flower Fragrance:

Slightly Fragrant

Bloom Time:

Late Spring/Early Summer

Blooms repeatedly



Patent Information:

Patent expired

Other Details:


Sets hips

Pruning Instructions:

Blooms on new wood; prune early to promote new growth

Soil pH requirements:

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

Propagation Methods:

From softwood cuttings

From semi-hardwood cuttings

From hardwood cuttings

By grafting

By budding

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Water Requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us


This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Phoenix, Arizona

Grass Valley, California

Menifee, California

San Diego, California

San Dimas, California

San Leandro, California

Denver, Colorado

Ocala, Florida

Palm City, Florida

Panama City, Florida

Chicago, Illinois

Downers Grove, Illinois

Noblesville, Indiana

Kalona, Iowa

Vidalia, Louisiana

Piedmont, Missouri

Elba, New York

Matthews, North Carolina

Sanford, North Carolina

Winston Salem, North Carolina

Diamond, Ohio

North Augusta, South Carolina

Dallas, Texas

Victoria, Texas

Whitesboro, Texas

Willis, Texas

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Gardeners' Notes:


On May 27, 2013, midgey from Denver, CO wrote:

heirloom is perhaps the perfect rose. gracing us with it's ever changing color cycle , in bloom, and aging. i first planted this rose from j and p in 1990, did unbelievably well. lived in a different location then. the rose shot gorgeous 5 and 6 bud's 5 and 6 inches across in bloom and 12 to 14 inch stems. the comments were endless from passers by , notes left on my door. seriously a wonderfully bred rose. they start purple fade to blue ish gray. one of my heirloom plants transplanted well the other died. it is now 23 years old and shows absolutely no signs of slowing down. does need massive pruning, essential. down to four strong canes 14 inches tall. this will give you a gorgeous grandiflora. feed it regularly, and soak heavy and it will go strong. wonderful, wonderful... read more


On May 16, 2011, dontruman from Victoria, TX wrote:

I have two in my garden; one originally bare root and the other potted. Both were planted during the same season and there is no difference between them in size and performance. Does exceptionally well in Zone 9a sending up new canes and blooming from Spring until the first hard freeze. Fragrant with a sweet scent, it shows a grandiflora, floribunda ancestry with the flowers often coming in clusters of 3 to 5. One of the lowest maintenance roses in my garden and I have over 50 varieties, half of which are low maintenance antique roses.


On Oct 15, 2010, PenelopeEC from Dallas, TX wrote:

This rose is just wonderful in my garden! Buds are similar in color to Stephen's Big Purple, and they age to a very elegant mauve. They also smell fabulous. To me they smell like sweet lemons,but it is just soooo strong. Beautiful all around.


On Apr 11, 2009, Joan from Belfield, ND (Zone 4a) wrote:

Editor's Note

Plant Patent number 3234 has expired


On Jul 1, 2007, prplepeep from Sanford, NC wrote:

I am totaly in love with this rose. The color is wonderful muave to violet, the smell...amazing, reminds me of the smell of a big patch of wild roses growing along side the road. I have two, both of them plentiful with buds and flowers. I can't walk by it without stopping to smell this rose!


On Jul 14, 2005, FrankBlissett from Sault Sainte Marie, MI wrote:

Bought one in 2004, and it survived its first Zone4b winter without protection. It had a bad time with black spot last year though (very dry this year, but still got some black spot). Too soon to tell if it'll thrive up here, but the flowers are quite beautiful and fairly prolific.


On Apr 30, 2004, Toxicodendron from Piedmont, MO (Zone 6a) wrote:

Heirloom has made it through the past 3 winters here in zone 6 without any problems...no dieback at all this year. This is a fragrant purplish rose with strong canes. Mine is over 4 feet tall right now and loaded with buds(April).