Dainty Lady Palm, Guilin Dwarf Palm

Guihaia argyrata

Family: Arecaceae (ar-ek-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Guihaia (gwee-HAH-yah) (Info)
Species: argyrata (ar-jy-RAY-tuh) (Info)
Synonym:Trachycarpus argyratus


Tropicals and Tender Perennials


Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us


12-18 in. (30-45 cm)

18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

36-48 in. (90-120 cm)


24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

36-48 in. (90-120 cm)

4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)


USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Sun Exposure:

Light Shade

Partial to Full Shade


Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Unknown - Tell us


Grown for foliage


Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

7.9 to 8.5 (alkaline)

8.6 to 9.0 (strongly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

Unknown - Tell us

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us


This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Encino, California

Reseda, California

Cape Coral, Florida

Grant, Florida

Jacksonville, Florida

Loxahatchee, Florida

Ocala, Florida

Augusta, Georgia

San Antonio, Texas

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Gardeners' Notes:


On Dec 28, 2014, southeastgarden from Jacksonville, FL (Zone 9a) wrote:

A friend of mine has a very nice specimen in zone 9a, just a few miles south of Jacksonville, Florida. He has had it for over a decade. The soil is acidic sand and he says he threw some limestone rock into the planting hole to approximate its native limestone cliffs in southern China and Vietnam.


On Aug 24, 2003, palmbob from Acton, CA (Zone 8b) wrote:

This is a very slow growing fan palm, but if you need a nice looking, small palm with attractive spoke-like leaves for a smaller, somewhat shady area of your garden, consider this one. It is a suckering species, but remains as a small clump its entire life, never spreading more than a foot or so. At its base are a lot of upwardly pointing spines in a swirl, so careful when pruning off dead leaves. It does better in warmer, subtropical areas, but many are growing it in So Cal (including me)... often grown in the sun, it seems to like shade more (but not deep shade).. sun turns its leaves yellowy. Native of China and Vietnam