Hazel Alder, Smooth Alder, Tag Alder, Swamp Alder
Alnus serrulata

Family: Betulaceae (beh-tyoo-LAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Alnus (AL-nus) (Info)
Species: serrulata (ser-yoo-LAY-tuh) (Info)
Synonym:Alnus incana var. serrulata
Synonym:Alnus noveboracensis
Synonym:Alnus serrulata var. subelliptica

Category:

Shrubs

Trees

Height:

6-8 ft. (1.8-2.4 m)

8-10 ft. (2.4-3 m)

10-12 ft. (3-3.6 m)

12-15 ft. (3.6-4.7 m)

15-20 ft. (4.7-6 m)

Spacing:

12-15 ft. (3.6-4.7 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 C (-30 F)

USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 C (-25 F)

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

Inconspicuous/none

Bloom Time:

N/A

Foliage:

Deciduous

Other details:

Requires consistently moist soil; do not let dry out between waterings

Soil pH requirements:

5.1 to 5.5 (strongly acidic)

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From seed; direct sow outdoors in fall

From seed; winter sow in vented containers, coldframe or unheated greenhouse

From seed; stratify if sowing indoors

Seed Collecting:

Allow seedheads to dry on plants; remove and collect seeds

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Atmore, Alabama

Morrilton, Arkansas

Winterthur, Delaware

Lawrenceville, Georgia

Monroe, Georgia

Bangor, Maine

Chatsworth, New Jersey

Youngstown, Ohio

Downingtown, Pennsylvania

show all

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Dec 28, 2013, Rickwebb from Downingtown, PA wrote:

I've seen it wild in a few spots along watercourses or ponds in southeast PA and northern Delaware. Seems like a nice native plant that would work in informal or naturalistic landscapes. It has handsome foliage and smooth gray bark. There is a very similar species of Speckled Alder that mostly grows farther north, though there is some overlap of range. The Speckled tends to be larger, has whitish lenticels on the stems, and has less even teeth on the leaf margins.

Neutral

On Aug 30, 2007, escambiaguy from Atmore, AL (Zone 8b) wrote:

Hazel Alder grows in wet areas along streams in my area. It commonly grows along with Sweetspire, Buttonbush, and Elderberry.