Amur Maple, Siberian Maple
Acer ginnala 'Flame'

Family: Sapindaceae (sap-in-DAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Acer (AY-ser) (Info)
Species: ginnala (jin-NAY-luh) (Info)
Cultivar: Flame
Synonym:Acer tataricum var. ginnala
Synonym:Acer tataricum subsp. ginnala
Synonym:Acer ginnala var. euginnala
Synonym:Acer tataricum var. aidzuense

Category:

Trees

Height:

15-20 ft. (4.7-6 m)

20-30 ft. (6-9 m)

Spacing:

20-30 ft. (6-9 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 2a: to -45.5 C (-50 F)

USDA Zone 2b: to -42.7 C (-45 F)

USDA Zone 3a: to -39.9 C (-40 F)

USDA Zone 3b: to -37.2 C (-35 F)

USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 C (-30 F)

USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 C (-25 F)

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

White/Near White

Inconspicuous/none

Bloom Time:

Mid Spring

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Deciduous

Good Fall Color

Other details:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Flowers are fragrant

Drought-tolerant; suitable for xeriscaping

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Soil pH requirements:

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

From woody stem cuttings

From softwood cuttings

From semi-hardwood cuttings

From seed; stratify if sowing indoors

From seed; direct sow after last frost

By grafting

By budding

Seed Collecting:

Allow seedheads to dry on plants; remove and collect seeds

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Brighton, Colorado

Littleton, Colorado

Dekalb, Illinois

Minneapolis, Minnesota

Saint Cloud, Minnesota

Corvallis, Montana

Cincinnati, Ohio

Lewisburg, Pennsylvania

Conroe, Texas

Beloit, Wisconsin

show all

Gardeners' Notes:

2
positives
2
neutrals
2
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On Jul 15, 2015, Rickwebb from Downingtown, PA wrote:

This is probably the most sold cultivar of the species. It develops a good red fall color while the mother species often just turns bright yellow. Check out the comments on the mother species. It can become an invasive East Asian plant.

Negative

On Mar 13, 2014, coriaceous from ROSLINDALE, MA wrote:

The Wisconsin and Minnesota DNR's consider this species invasive, and Connecticut has placed it on its list of potentially invasive plants. It has naturalized in 4 provinces and 15 northeastern and midwestern states.

Positive

On Jun 9, 2010, Clary from Lewisburg, PA (Zone 6b) wrote:

My experience with this tree is positive.

We have planted a row of these trees in a 20' wide strip of hardscape between our house and the neighboring one in our downtown neighborhood. We chose them for their small size, spreading habit, dense growth, and toughness to withstand urban conditions. We selected them specifically for shade and privacy.

So far they have proven to be beautiful and hardy.

UPDATE: These trees are doing very well. They tend to get a little blackspot in the most humid weeks of summer. This spring we thinned and shaped them to promote airflow and manage their spread. They responded well to the pruning. They've grown about 12 feet in 6 years with occasional fertilizer and deep watering as needed. Very nice tree for a small ... read more

Negative

On Mar 15, 2008, distantkin from Saint Cloud, MN (Zone 4b) wrote:

Amur maple (Acer ginnala) is considered invasive by the Minnesota DNR
"Ecological Threat:

* It displaces native shrubs and understory trees in open woods, and shades out native grasses and herbaceous plants in savanna habitat.
* A prolific seed producer, Amur maple is becoming invasive in the northern U.S. Extensive wild populations have been found in Illinois and Missouri. It resprouts easily from the cut stump.
* Amur maple is a native of central and northern China, Manchuria and Japan, it was introduced to North America in the 1860s. It is still being frequently sold commercially as an ornamental, and for wildlife and shelterbelt plantings."

Neutral

On Mar 28, 2005, PerryPost from Minneapolis, MN wrote:

Gorgeous fire red and neon orange fall colors compared to the burgundies found in the species.

Not recommended near native or naturalized areas. A.ginnala varieties are being watched in Minnesota and other states as being potentially invasive. Seedlings have been reported showing up in private restored prairie plantings.

Thrives in the pollution and compacted soil of midwest city conditions. Weigh the potential risks before planting in rural areas.

Positive

On Aug 30, 2003, Terry from Murfreesboro, TN (Zone 7a) wrote:

Dense, smaller tree; suitable for urban settings. 'Flame' produces fiery red foliage in the fall.