Lanceleaf Violet
Viola lanceolata

Family: Violaceae (vy-oh-LAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Viola (vy-OH-la) (Info)
Species: lanceolata (lan-see-oh-LAY-tuh) (Info)

Category:

Groundcovers

Perennials

Height:

under 6 in. (15 cm)

Spacing:

3-6 in. (7-15 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

White/Near White

Bloom Time:

Late Winter/Early Spring

Foliage:

Evergreen

Other details:

Requires consistently moist soil; do not let dry out between waterings

Very high moisture needs; suitable for bogs and water gardens

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

By dividing rhizomes, tubers, corms or bulbs (including offsets)

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Lutz, Florida

Orlando, Florida

Halifax, Massachusetts

Midland, Michigan

Navasota, Texas

Gardeners' Notes:

2
positives
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Jul 25, 2004, MotherNature4 from Bartow, FL (Zone 9a) wrote:

This lovely little white violet is common throughout Florida where there are bogs and swamps. It likes moist, sandy soil.

Positive

On Sep 2, 2003, ButterflyGardnr from Orlando, FL (Zone 9b) wrote:

This is a tiny little violet that I happened to accidentally rescue. It grows from rhizomes or from seeds. It requires moist soil and lots of sunshine. It is one of the earliest bloomers in my garden, starting to bloom at the end of January into February. It requires virtually no care and does not require any special care or fertilizer beyond what is naturally available from rainwater and the soil. I have not found it to be bothered by any garden pests either. This is a native plant. Another common name for this violet is Long-leaf Violet.