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Pachypodium
Pachypodium rutenbergianum

Family: Apocynaceae (a-pos-ih-NAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Pachypodium (pak-uh-PO-dee-um) (Info)
Species: rutenbergianum (ru-ten-berg-ee-AY-num) (Info)

Category:

Cactus and Succulents

Height:

4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)

6-8 ft. (1.8-2.4 m)

8-10 ft. (2.4-3 m)

10-12 ft. (3-3.6 m)

Spacing:

Unknown - Tell us

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Danger:

Plant has spines or sharp edges; use extreme caution when handling

Bloom Color:

Pale Yellow

Bloom Time:

Mid Winter

Foliage:

Deciduous

Other details:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

Unknown - Tell us

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Grenoble,

Tarzana, California

Brooksville, Florida

Miami, Florida

Fayetteville, North Carolina

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Jul 14, 2006, RWhiz from Spring Valley, CA (Zone 10a) wrote:

Relatively fast growing for a Pachypodium. It is probably the largest also, easily attaining tree proportions. Rots easily in winter when cold and extended wet. I lost the one I had planted in ground this past winter. More winter tender than my other Pachypodiums.

Neutral

On Sep 15, 2003, palmbob from Acton, CA (Zone 8b) wrote:

One of the large Pachypodium species, I saw this plant at two different times of the year, and looking very different (at a research garden in Miami, Florida)

In southern California this species is somewhat marginal, but in 10a and above, with minimal protection, does OK, though is deciduous in the winter. Ideally, this is the best time of year to withold water, but unfortunately that is when it rains in southern California. So if not planted in excellently draining soil and given a bit of protection from frost, will rot easily in late winter.