Western Sand Cherry, Sandcherry, Bessey Cherry, Rocky Mountain Cherry, Hansen's Bush Cherry
Prunus pumila var. besseyi

Family: Rosaceae (ro-ZAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Prunus (PROO-nus) (Info)
Species: pumila var. besseyi
Synonym:Prunus besseyi
Synonym:Prunus pumila subsp. besseyi

Category:

Shrubs

Foliage Color:

Burgundy

Bronze-Green

Bloom Characteristics:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Flowers are fragrant

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant; suitable for xeriscaping

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

36-48 in. (90-120 cm)

4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)

6-8 ft. (1.8-2.4 m)

Spacing:

4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 3a: to -39.9 C (-40 F)

USDA Zone 3b: to -37.2 C (-35 F)

USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 C (-30 F)

USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 C (-25 F)

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Pink

White/Near White

Bloom Time:

Late Winter/Early Spring

Mid Spring

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Deciduous

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

From herbaceous stem cuttings

From woody stem cuttings

Seed Collecting:

Remove fleshy coating on seeds before storing

Allow unblemished fruit to ripen; clean and dry seeds

Properly cleaned, seed can be successfully stored

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Chino Valley, Arizona

Saint Charles, Illinois

Nottingham, Maryland

Billerica, Massachusetts

Farmington, New Mexico

Cibolo, Texas

Manassas, Virginia

show all

Gardeners' Notes:

0
positives
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On Jul 20, 2006, jkramer from Saint Charles, IL (Zone 5a) wrote:

Flowering shrub that produces an abundance of cherries, especially when two or more are planted for pollination. Grows in cold climates, producing white flowers starting in May, followed in mid-summer with " purple-black cherries for eating fresh, preserves or pies. Cherries are small and even when they appear ripe, they may be sour. They become somewhat sweet when the fruit slips easily from the stems. This is a pretty little bush in the spring - my neutral rating is based on some disappointment with the quality of the fruit.