Eleocharis dulcis

Family: Cyperaceae (sy-peer-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Eleocharis (el-ee-OK-ar-iss) (Info)
Species: dulcis (DUL-sis) (Info)


Ponds and Aquatics

Tropicals and Tender Perennials

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Water Requirements:

Requires consistently moist soil; do not let dry out between waterings

Very high moisture needs; suitable for bogs and water gardens

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us


12-18 in. (30-45 cm)


12-15 in. (30-38 cm)


USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun


Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Unknown - Tell us


Unknown - Tell us

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

Patent Information:


Propagation Methods:

By dividing the rootball

By dividing rhizomes, tubers, corms or bulbs (including offsets)

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us


This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Jacksonville, Florida

Orange Springs, Florida

Gardeners' Notes:


On Jul 7, 2015, janelp_lee from Toronto, ON (Zone 6a) wrote:

You can purchase the viable fresh bulbs cheap from Asian grocery store or supermarket!

You can grow them in the deep paint bucket in full sun location. Very easy to grow this water plant/root vegetable! Medicinal.


On Jul 20, 2010, AmyMorie from Green Cove Springs, FL (Zone 9a) wrote:

Very easy to grow so far here in N Florida. Give plenty of sunlight.


On Nov 10, 2003, Michaelp from Glendale, UT (Zone 5a) wrote:

This needs the same conditions as rice or water raised taro. Water chestnuts require fertile soil and shallow water, with high temperatures. The top has a tuft of smooth straight leaves - the bulb sends out a lot of runners that grow dark brown corms at the end, about an inch or so in size. They are edible raw or cooked - they are sweet and crunchy, with a nutty flavor. They can be raised in a kid's plastic pool, in just a few inches of water.

Harvest is easy from a container: all the fruit is right on the bottom of the pool next to the plastic, and easy to get to. If raised in a pond the nuts have to be dug for and are some work to find. They grow good here in Florida and they are invasive in warm areas, so it is best not to put them in a pond where their growth can't be ... read more