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PlantFiles: Mango
Mangifera indica 'Keitt'

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Family: Anacardiaceae (an-a-kard-ee-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Mangifera (man-GEF-er-uh) (Info)
Species: indica (IN-dih-kuh) (Info)
Cultivar: Keitt

5 members have or want this plant for trade.

Category:
Edible Fruits and Nuts
Trees
Tropicals and Tender Perennials

Height:
over 40 ft. (12 m)

Spacing:
20-30 ft. (6-9 m)

Hardiness:
USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

Sun Exposure:
Full Sun

Danger:
Handling plant may cause skin irritation or allergic reaction

Bloom Color:
Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:
Unknown - Tell us

Foliage:
Evergreen
Shiny/Glossy-Textured

Other details:
Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:
Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:
Non-patented

Propagation Methods:
By grafting
By budding
By air layering

Seed Collecting:
N/A: plant does not set seed, flowers are sterile, or plants will not come true from seed

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Thumbnail #7 of Mangifera indica by Thaumaturgist

There are a total of 8 photos.
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Profile:

4 positives
No neutrals
No negatives

Gardeners' Notes:

RatingAuthorContent
Positive WalterT On Feb 24, 2005, WalterT from San Diego, CA (Zone 10a) wrote:

Mangos are in the same family as poison oak/ivy and the juice can cause a severe, itchy, blistery reaction on the hands and face of allergic people, so after eating one be sure to wash hands/face thoroughly. As for squirrels, etc., just wrap a 3 foot wide sheet of tin or aluminium around the trunk of the tree (any fruit tree, for that matter) to foil the little rascals. Periodically remove the metal to check for snails, etc. under it. Make sure that no branches come near the ground or near to any other tree that wld allow squirrels to jump across.
Yes, Keitt, Kent and Haden mangos are all large, sweet and juicy when allowed to ripen. I have had good fruit from a mango tree grown from seed, so do try that method. It takes about 5 years for a tree to start bearing fruit.
You can find a lot more info on mango culture on my site: WalterT - San Diego . In September 2005 Keitt mangos became available commercially in supermarkets. They a
re grown near Riverside, CA, east of Los Angeles and are very large and mostly green in color. When fully ripe Keitt mangos are fibre free, sweet and tangy in flavor. The seeds are not large or thick so there is plenty of delicious flesh to enjoy. Now, in early November the season seems to be ending. WTH E-mail: w-hans@webtv.net

Positive sonotaps On Feb 23, 2005, sonotaps from Phoenix, AZ wrote:

They grow Keitt mangos on a commercial basis in Coachella, California (desert near Palm Springs). I've tasted them, and they are full of 'late season' goodness. Fiberless.

The tree itself is very large with an 'open' growth habit so I would say not typically good for home use unless you have lots of room.

Positive Wescott On Jul 28, 2004, Wescott from Melbourne, FL wrote:

I lost most of my fruit this year due to a drought after blooming. Next year, I will irrigate.
They prepare and freeze well and taste fresh a year later. My tree is 10 years old and about 20 ft tall.
My biggest problem is the squirrel population. I don't blame them because these are the best tasting, low fiber mango I've ever had. How can I discourage these furry pests?

Positive Thaumaturgist On Nov 22, 2003, Thaumaturgist from Rockledge, FL (Zone 10a) wrote:

"Keitt" Mango is characterized by its unusually large size among all Florida Mangoes.

It is also one of the last Mangoes of the season, often
bearing as late as the end of September or early October in Florida.

Regional...

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Fallbrook, California
Rialto, California
San Diego, California
Santa Ana, California
Big Pine Key, Florida
Lake Worth, Florida
Melbourne, Florida
Merritt Island, Florida
Pompano Beach, Florida
Rockledge, Florida
Honomu, Hawaii



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