Aloe
Aloe divaricata

Family: Aloaceae
Genus: Aloe (AL-oh) (Info)
Species: divaricata (dy-vair-ih-KAY-tuh) (Info)

Category:

Cactus and Succulents

Height:

18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

36-48 in. (90-120 cm)

Spacing:

24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

36-48 in. (90-120 cm)

4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Sun Exposure:

Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:

Plant has spines or sharp edges; use extreme caution when handling

Bloom Color:

Rose/Mauve

Bloom Time:

Late Winter/Early Spring

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Evergreen

Blue-Green

Burgundy

Succulent

Other details:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Drought-tolerant; suitable for xeriscaping

Provides winter interest

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

By dividing rhizomes, tubers, corms or bulbs (including offsets)

From herbaceous stem cuttings

From seed; germinate in vitro in gelatin, agar or other medium

Seed Collecting:

Bag seedheads to capture ripening seed

Allow pods to dry on plant; break open to collect seeds

Allow seedheads to dry on plants; remove and collect seeds

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Apache Junction, Arizona

Mesa, Arizona

Tempe, Arizona

Bonsall, California

Los Angeles, California

Rancho Santa Fe, California

Reseda, California

San Diego, California

Spring Valley, California

Thousand Oaks, California

Vista, California

Tallahassee, Florida

show all

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On Aug 30, 2009, Porphyrostachys from Portland, OR (Zone 8b) wrote:

Doesn't mind the heat or a little sun in the desert, but not very hardy if kept away from the home or a warm wall. The 2007 frost knocked most specimens. Not a reliable bloomer here either, but a cool looking Aloe that can get decently tall if protected.

Positive

On Dec 7, 2003, palmbob from Acton, CA (Zone 8b) wrote:

This is one of the most spectacularly colored Aloes you can grow... in full sun the colors range all over the place with deep turquoises, purples, reds, greys and sea-greens. It is a suckering sort of thin-stemmed aloe that can make a hedge if allowed. It has some spines that are sharp, but not dangerous. This one is from Madagascar. In winter it forms a large head of deep red simple flowers on multibranched racemes. A seedling will grow into a blooming adult in just a few years, in southern California at least. Suckering but sometimes solitary species with deep red marginal teeth on the leaves.