Cabbage
Brassica oleracea var. capitata 'Jersey Wakefield'

Family: Brassicaceae (brass-ih-KAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Brassica (BRAS-ee-ka) (Info)
Species: oleracea var. capitata
Cultivar: Jersey Wakefield

Category:

Vegetables

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

12-18 in. (30-45 cm)

Spacing:

12-15 in. (30-38 cm)

Hardiness:

Not Applicable

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Unknown - Tell us

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Herbaceous

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

From seed; sow indoors before last frost

Seed Collecting:

Allow seedheads to dry on plants; remove and collect seeds

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Troy, Virginia

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On Oct 21, 2004, trifunov from Brandon, MS (Zone 8a) wrote:

Matures in 65 days. Start seeds inside 6 weeks before last spring frost, transplant outside in 5 weeks, spacing 12in apart. Can be grown as a fall crop.

Positive

On Dec 8, 2003, Farmerdill from Augusta, GA (Zone 8a) wrote:

This is an early 60 day cabbage that dates back to the 19th century. In 1888 Burpee listed 8 cone head cabbages including the French Oxheart. This is apparently the only one still available. The Charleston is a later introduction, It is small (1-2 lbs) but quick. Earliness is its main virtue, but it was a leading market cabbage for over 50 years. Like all of its type it is better for cooking than eating fresh, but if you want cabbage rolls early, the leaves have good flavor and don't come apart.