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PlantFiles: Japanese Umbrella Pine
Sciadopitys verticillata

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Family: Sciadopityaceae
Genus: Sciadopitys (sigh-uh-DOP-ih-tiss) (Info)
Species: verticillata (ver-ti-si-LAH-tuh) (Info)

Synonym:Taxus verticillata

4 vendors have this plant for sale.

3 members have or want this plant for trade.

Category:
Conifers

Height:
20-30 ft. (6-9 m)

Spacing:
15-20 ft. (4.7-6 m)

Hardiness:
USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 C (-25 F)
USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)
USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)
USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)
USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)
USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)
USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)
USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)
USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)
USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)
USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)
USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

Sun Exposure:
Full Sun

Danger:
Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:
Inconspicuous/none

Bloom Time:
N/A

Foliage:
Grown for foliage
Evergreen

Other details:
Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Soil pH requirements:
5.1 to 5.5 (strongly acidic)
5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)
6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

Patent Information:
Non-patented

Propagation Methods:
Unknown - Tell us

Seed Collecting:
Unknown - Tell us

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There are a total of 22 photos.
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Profile:

3 positives
No neutrals
1 negative

Gardeners' Notes:

RatingAuthorContent
Positive epblj On Aug 7, 2011, epblj from Millville, MA wrote:

On May 31, 2010, calmauzor from Milford, DE wrote:
"I know I shouldn't laugh, but so many of these comments sounded just like ME! I too, fell in love with this plant when I first saw it and got just a few pieces from a friend. Well, these few pieces have mushroomed into a huge, garden-devouring monster!".................He must have been mistaken about the type of plant/tree when he commented.
I first saw this tree last year when I happened upon a nursery that opens to the public once a year (and that's barely advertised). It was the most unique trees I had ever seen. Their biggest one stood about eight feet tall. I was fortunate that the nursery had smaller trees for sale. I bought one that was only 6" tall for about $15.00. I planted it in with my perennials in rich top soil and did not fertilize it. It wintered fine here in Millville, MA which happened to have snow on the ground for about 3 months this past year. It has grown about 3" since planting last summer. Definitely a slow grower. Then I met a couple and visited their home to discover they had the very same tree and theirs stood about 6' tall. I was told their tree was about 16 years old. It was so full and gorgeous. That was in Smithfield, RI.

Negative calmauzor On May 31, 2010, calmauzor from Milford, DE wrote:

I know I shouldn't laugh, but so many of these comments sounded just like ME! I too, fell in love with this plant when I first saw it and got just a few pieces from a friend. Well, these few pieces have mushroomed into a huge, garden-devouring monster! I still do really like it's looks ... very graceful and pleasing .... but it's no longer welcome in what's left of my flower-bed. I've started first digging it up and then hoeing out all the roots I can possibly find! It totally consumed my bee balm and don't know what else. Don't want it ANYmore!

Positive maliq On Jun 28, 2008, maliq from Princeton, MA (Zone 5a) wrote:

We purchased a beautifully landscaped house here on a mountain in Princeton, MA, about a half zone colder than the towns around us, with lots of wind and ice and snow. But with lots of tall oaks and hickories around, we are sheltered.
Two of these trees are on a corner of the house, shading a sun room. They are spectacular. Just about 15 ft each, they catch the eye of everyone who walks the gardens, and no one (myself included) seems to have ever seen one before. The best thing is that their openness prevents their interior from being dark like most other pines. Light permeates, and the ground underneath is clearly visible and accessible to all the garden residents, fuzzy and feathered alike.
A great specimen, or anchor. Totally maintenance free, with a beautiful natural conical form. The needles need to be seen, since they're like no other conifer. The new growth in early summer makes for an intricate eye-catching texture.
These are interplanted with rhodys, azaleas, variegated euonymous, and a dogwood close by. This collection has a great 'prehistoric' feel, which I love.

Positive palmbob On Dec 31, 2003, palmbob from Acton, CA (Zone 8b) wrote:

This is a unique and beautiful conifer that is a collector's item here in So Cal where it is very marginal except along the constantly cool coast. The tree cannot tolerate HOT DRY SUMMERS (can't comment on humid summers)! Don't waste your money on it if you live in such a climate. It does much better up north. Many have tried to grow this plant in inland southern California with extremely limited success... but it sure is a beauty!!

It has two kinds of leaves- needles and scales along the branches. It makes cones of both sexes on one tree (monoecieous). Here in So Cal it is either bonsaid, or grown as a large shrub or small tree. However, in the mountains of Japan, it can grow up to 120' tall. This tree is so different molecularly and evolutionarily from all other conifers it has been recently put into its own family.

Regional...

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Stamford, Connecticut
Westport, Connecticut
Alto, Georgia
Elburn, Illinois
Plainfield, Indiana
Dracut, Massachusetts
East Falmouth, Massachusetts
East Longmeadow, Massachusetts
Millville, Massachusetts
Princeton, Massachusetts
Westford, Massachusetts
Exeter, New Hampshire
Allentown, New Jersey
Ithaca, New York
Poughkeepsie, New York
Boone, North Carolina
Indian Trail, North Carolina
Salisbury, North Carolina
Weaverville, North Carolina
Chesterland, Ohio
Cincinnati, Ohio
Cleveland, Ohio
West Chester, Pennsylvania
Lexington, Virginia
Richmond, Virginia
La Conner, Washington
Woodinville, Washington
Yelm, Washington



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