Aloe
Aloe mcloughlinii

Family: Aloaceae
Genus: Aloe (AL-oh) (Info)
Species: mcloughlinii (mak-lowh-LIN-ee-eye) (Info)

Category:

Cactus and Succulents

Height:

6-12 in. (15-30 cm)

12-18 in. (30-45 cm)

Spacing:

12-15 in. (30-38 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:

Plant has spines or sharp edges; use extreme caution when handling

Bloom Color:

Pink

Bloom Time:

Late Spring/Early Summer

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Evergreen

Shiny/Glossy-Textured

Mottled

Succulent

Other details:

Drought-tolerant; suitable for xeriscaping

Suitable for growing in containers

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

By dividing the rootball

From seed; winter sow in vented containers, coldframe or unheated greenhouse

From seed; germinate in a damp paper towel

Seed Collecting:

Bag seedheads to capture ripening seed

Allow pods to dry on plant; break open to collect seeds

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Mesa, Arizona

Phoenix, Arizona

Spring Valley, California

Vista, California

Dallas, Texas

Gardeners' Notes:

0
positives
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On Nov 6, 2008, palmbob from Acton, CA (Zone 8b) wrote:

will the real Aloe mcloughlinii please make itself known? I have seen plants identified as this over and over, in botanical gardens and private collections, yet all could just as easily be Aloe hemmingii, another Somalian species and an extremely common plant in cultivation. Aloe hemmingii is often sold erroneously as Aloe harlana as well, only at least the latter is a much larger plant and has very different flowers. How to tell Aloe mcloughlanii and hemmingii apart is not something I know. But the flowers described in Reynold's book on aloes never match any of the plants I see in cultivation, so I am suspicious that even the plants on this page are really all hemmingii. Whatever... they look so close you get the idea, at least.