Aloe
Aloe fosteri

Family: Aloaceae
Genus: Aloe (AL-oh) (Info)
Species: fosteri (FOS-ter-ee) (Info)

Category:

Cactus and Succulents

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant; suitable for xeriscaping

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

under 6 in. (15 cm)

6-12 in. (15-30 cm)

Spacing:

9-12 in. (22-30 cm)

12-15 in. (30-38 cm)

15-18 in. (38-45 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Sun Exposure:

Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:

Plant has spines or sharp edges; use extreme caution when handling

Bloom Color:

Red

Scarlet (Dark Red)

Orange

Red-Orange

Bright Yellow

Bloom Time:

Mid Fall

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Evergreen

Mottled

Succulent

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

Unknown - Tell us

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

El Macero, California

Fairfield, California

Los Angeles, California

Reseda, California

Spring Valley, California

Vista, California

Bell, Florida

show all

Gardeners' Notes:

0
positives
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On Jan 11, 2004, palmbob from Acton, CA (Zone 8b) wrote:

many other species of aloe look similar to this one... I really have trouble telling these spotted aloes apart. But once you get to know them a bit better, I would say this is the best looking of them all.. this one gets up to 2' across, though, and has linear striations as well as the flecking nice mottling on leaves. Prominent and very sharp brownish teeth along the leaf margins. Very slow to sucker, if at all (unusual for a spotted aloe). Flowers are in the fall and highly branched, are variable in coloration and spectacular- one of the best looking flowers of the spotted aloes. Stemless aloe from South Africa. Produces one flower spike at a time, but flowers have so many branching racemes (dozens sometimes) that it looks like there must be a lot more.