Aloe
Aloe affinis

Family: Aloaceae
Genus: Aloe (AL-oh) (Info)
Species: affinis (uh-FEE-niss) (Info)

Category:

Cactus and Succulents

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant; suitable for xeriscaping

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

12-18 in. (30-45 cm)

Spacing:

18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Sun Exposure:

Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:

Plant has spines or sharp edges; use extreme caution when handling

Bloom Color:

Pink

Red

Bloom Time:

Mid Winter

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Evergreen

Succulent

Provides winter interest

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

Unknown - Tell us

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Mobile, Alabama

Carefree, Arizona

Los Angeles, California

Reseda, California

Spring Valley, California

Vista, California

show all

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Feb 5, 2006, RWhiz from Spring Valley, CA (Zone 10a) wrote:

This plant grows well in full sun in Southern California. It is easily rooted in potting soil with warmth.

Neutral

On Jan 25, 2004, palmbob from Acton, CA (Zone 8b) wrote:

'Ordinary' aloe shaped plant with nice, pink-red flowers in the winter here in So Cal. One web site says in flowers in Phoenix spring through fall, though. This plant rarely suckers. The leaves have some mild linear flecking of white and sharp but small spines along the edges. This aloe is often grouped into the 'maculate' or spotted aloes- all stemless, heavily spotted, often suckering plants with prominent sharp marginal teeth and open red to orange to yellow inflorescences. This one differs by not suckering and having almost no spots, and flower racemes are denser and redder than most.

Some are now including Aloe immaculata in this species as well- normally a more pink-flowering species and one completely devoid of spots, but with the similar prominent lines on the le... read more