Central Australian Cabbage Palm, Central Australian Fan Palm
Livistona mariae

Family: Arecaceae (ar-ek-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Livistona (liv-iss-TOH-nuh) (Info)
Species: mariae (mar-EE-ay) (Info)

Category:

Palms

Foliage Color:

Burgundy

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant; suitable for xeriscaping

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

30-40 ft. (9-12 m)

over 40 ft. (12 m)

Spacing:

10-12 ft. (3-3.6 m)

12-15 ft. (3.6-4.7 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Unknown - Tell us

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Evergreen

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

From seed; germinate in vitro in gelatin, agar or other medium

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Tucson, Arizona

Fairfield, California

Fallbrook, California

Los Angeles, California

Oceanside, California

San Diego, California

Thousand Oaks, California

Palm Bay, Florida

show all

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Jan 27, 2004, palmbob from Acton, CA (Zone 8b) wrote:

Though once mature this palm looks pretty much like most other Australian Livistonas, with the naked trunks, drooping leaflet tips and full crowns of deeply split fan leaves, as a juvenile, this palm has a good deal of color unique to this palm. Seedlings in full sun are nearly red, or at least maroon. THis color leaves the leaves first, then the petioles before the plant forms a trunk. It is a relatively fast grower, and pretty hardy here in So Cal. There are several 'varieties' of this species, the most well known being Livistona 'rigida' (some consider that a separate species, and some do not) but I personally can't tell them apart. Recent research (2005) has elevated the 'varieties' to species status- so Livistona rigida and occidentalis are now separate species.