Aloe
Aloe lineata

Family: Aloaceae
Genus: Aloe (AL-oh) (Info)
Species: lineata (lin-ee-AY-tuh) (Info)
Synonym:Aloe perfoliata var. lineata
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Category:

Cactus and Succulents

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant; suitable for xeriscaping

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)

6-8 ft. (1.8-2.4 m)

Spacing:

8-10 ft. (2.4-3 m)

10-12 ft. (3-3.6 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Danger:

Plant has spines or sharp edges; use extreme caution when handling

Bloom Color:

Red-Orange

Bloom Time:

Late Summer/Early Fall

Mid Fall

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Evergreen

Succulent

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From woody stem cuttings

From seed; germinate in vitro in gelatin, agar or other medium

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Long Beach, California

Mission Viejo, California

Norwalk, California

Reseda, California

San Jose, California

San Marino, California

Spring Valley, California

Vista, California

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Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Jan 27, 2004, palmbob from Acton, CA (Zone 8b) wrote:

This is particulary attractive vigorous 'shrub aloe' (literally a tree aloe, but takes forever to get that tall) with nice red-orange, unbranching flowers in the fall (at least here in So Cal- may flower multiple times- not sure). Leaves are a lime green to somewhat bluish-green that contrast nicely with the flowers. The leaves are finely lined, and have very sharp, orange teeth that face back toward the center of the plant - sharp, but not as bad as those found on the var muirii. Plants in wild tend towards solitary, though suckering forms exist, but plants growing in cultivation tend to be all suckering (either are hybrids, or are clones from the few suckering plants collected in the wild). This form differs primarily from var. murii in having softer, paler leaves with a a bit more... read more