Green Antelopehorn, Green Milkweed, Spider Milkweed
Asclepias viridis

Family: Apocynaceae (a-pos-ih-NAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Asclepias (ass-KLE-pee-us) (Info)
Species: viridis (VEER-ih-diss) (Info)
Synonym:Acerates paniculata
Synonym:Anthanotis viridis
Synonym:Asclepias longipetala
Synonym:Gomphocarpus viridis
Synonym:Podostigma viridis

Category:

Perennials

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant; suitable for xeriscaping

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

12-18 in. (30-45 cm)

Spacing:

24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Danger:

All parts of plant are poisonous if ingested

Bloom Color:

Pale Green

Bloom Time:

Late Spring/Early Summer

Mid Summer

Foliage:

Herbaceous

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From seed; direct sow outdoors in fall

Seed Collecting:

Allow pods to dry on plant; break open to collect seeds

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Barling, Arkansas

North Little Rock, Arkansas

Shawnee Mission, Kansas

Louisville, Kentucky

Columbia, Missouri

Moyock, North Carolina

Hulbert, Oklahoma

Sawyer, Oklahoma

Arlington, Texas

Beaumont, Texas

Dallas, Texas

Fort Worth, Texas

Weatherford, Texas

Willis, Texas

Leesburg, Virginia

show all

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Oct 8, 2004, frostweed from Josephine, Arlington, TX (Zone 8a) wrote:

Green Milkweed could very well go unnoticed as you pass by. But if you look closely you will find an amazing flower.
The fluff surrounding the seeds is used by Goldfinches to
line their nests. It was also used in the making of candle wicks by early settlers.
Asclepias viridis Is native to Texas and other States.
This plant volunteered in my garden and grows freely around this area.