Prickly-Mallow
Sida spinosa

Family: Malvaceae (mal-VAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Sida (SEE-duh) (Info)
Species: spinosa (spy-NO-suh) (Info)

Category:

Annuals

Height:

36-48 in. (90-120 cm)

Spacing:

15-18 in. (38-45 cm)

18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

Hardiness:

Not Applicable

Sun Exposure:

Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:

Seed is poisonous if ingested

Bloom Color:

Coral/Apricot

Orange

Bloom Time:

Late Spring/Early Summer

Mid Summer

Late Summer/Early Fall

Mid Fall

Foliage:

Herbaceous

Velvet/Fuzzy-Textured

Other details:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Drought-tolerant; suitable for xeriscaping

Self-sows freely; deadhead if you do not want volunteer seedlings next season

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From seed; direct sow after last frost

Seed Collecting:

Allow pods to dry on plant; break open to collect seeds

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Benton, Kentucky

Cypress, Texas

San Antonio, Texas

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Aug 18, 2005, melody from Benton, KY (Zone 7a) wrote:

I've seen this cheerful little weed growing in all sorts of waste places here in west KY. I do not actually cultivate it myself.

The small yellow flowers open for a short time on sunny mornings, otherwise, it's a pretty drab plant.

The flowers are attractive to many insects and the seeds are eaten by songbirds. It has a multibranched appearance and is easy to overlook.

It does not seem to be overly invasive and doesn't pose an allergy problem to me, so, if it's good for the critters...it can stay.

Neutral

On Jul 25, 2005, htop from San Antonio, TX (Zone 8b) wrote:

I have not grown this plant, but have observed it in its natural habitat.

Prickly-mallow is also called prickly fanpetals and is a native plant that is found in the United States from the midwestern to the eastern states south to Florida and Texas and in Arizona. It also in tropical America. It inhabits croplands, abandoned fields, cultivated fields, pastures, gardens, empty lots, grassy areas along railroads and roadsides and waste areas with recently disturbed soil. It has a shallow taproot that divides into secondary roots and spreads by reseeding itself occasionally forming colonies.

It grows to a height of 1 to 2 feet and has branching occasionally. The stems are erect covered with fine white hairs. The 2" long and 1" wide alternate, elliptical, ovate or ... read more