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PlantFiles: English Rose, Austin Rose
Rosa 'Tess of the d'Urbervilles'

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Family: Rosaceae (ro-ZAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Rosa (RO-zuh) (Info)
Cultivar: Tess of the d'Urbervilles
Additional cultivar information: (aka AUSmove)
Hybridized by Austin; Year of Registration or Introduction: 1998

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One vendor has this plant for sale.

3 members have or want this plant for trade.

Class:
English Rose (aka Austin Rose)
Shrub

Height:
4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)
6-8 ft. (1.8-2.4 m)

Spacing:
36-48 in. (90-120 cm)

Hardiness:
USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)
USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)
USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)
USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)
USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)
USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)
USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)
USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)
USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)
USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)
USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

Bloom Color:
Dark red (dr)

Bloom Shape:
Double
Cupped
Nodding

Flower Fragrance:
Very Fragrant

Bloom Time:
Late Spring/Early Summer
Blooms repeatedly

Habit:
Shrub
Trained to climb

Patent Information:
Non-patented

Other Details:
Unknown - Tell us

Pruning Instructions:
Blooms on new wood; prune early to promote new growth

Soil pH requirements:
5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)
6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

Propagation Methods:
From softwood cuttings
From semi-hardwood cuttings
From hardwood cuttings
By grafting
By budding

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By Paulwhwest
Thumbnail #1 of Rosa  by Paulwhwest

By DonnaMack
Thumbnail #2 of Rosa  by DonnaMack

By winterkill
Thumbnail #3 of Rosa  by winterkill

By winterkill
Thumbnail #4 of Rosa  by winterkill

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Thumbnail #5 of Rosa  by winterkill

By DonnaMack
Thumbnail #6 of Rosa  by DonnaMack

By Gabrielle
Thumbnail #7 of Rosa  by Gabrielle

There are a total of 10 photos.
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Profile:

2 positives
1 neutral
No negatives

Gardeners' Notes:

RatingAuthorContent
Positive Seandor On Feb 6, 2009, Seandor from Springfield, MA (Zone 6a) wrote:

ABSOLUTELY amazing!!!! last June was the first blossoms - the entire plant was a cascade of bright magenta pink!

Neutral Joan On Nov 14, 2008, Joan from Belfield, ND (Zone 4a) wrote:

According to David Austin's 2009 Handbook of Roses, they named this rose after the character from Thomas Hardy's novel.

Positive DonnaMack On May 30, 2005, DonnaMack from Elgin, IL (Zone 5a) wrote:

Tess Of the d'Urbervilles is my only Austin. I purchased it for my zone 5a garden from White Flower Farm last year. It is amazing. It was problem free from the time I put it in, which was April of 2004. The growth on it is definitely robust. When Austin states in his catalog that it is 4 feet by 3.5 feet or 6 to 8 feet as a climber, he should really emphasize the latter. One stem is over 8 feet, several are about 4 feet, and smaller stems are coming from the base, at least three feet in front of the main stems. I had to install a small trellis to restrain the tall stem. The smaller, as well as the larger stems have flowers appearing in small clusters at the end of the stems, and all of the stems, of whatever weight, bend forward and therefore require discreet staking.

The disease resistance is remarkable. Last year, a really awful year for blackspot and mildew, it got none, whereas Rose de Rescht got quite bit of blackspot, and Dublin Bay got a bit of mildew on the ends of stems where flowers were
forming (but bloomed nicely anyway). It also does not attract japanese beetles, which seemed to prefer Morden Blush flowers (puzzling, since the scent is mild) and the leaves of Rose de Rescht. The leaves are shiny and new growth is reddish. It is lovely without bloom, but at present, I have well over 50 huge buds all over the plant. It is elegant and refined. I would happily purchase it again - but it's BIG! P.S. I looks great with gentian sage, aliums and digitalis mertonensis.

Regional...

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

,
Grayslake, Illinois
Washington, Illinois
Los Alamos, New Mexico
Norristown, Pennsylvania
Orwell, Vermont



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