Aloe
Aloe 'Quicksilver'

Family: Aloaceae
Genus: Aloe (AL-oh) (Info)
Cultivar: Quicksilver

Category:

Cactus and Succulents

Height:

under 6 in. (15 cm)

Spacing:

6-9 in. (15-22 cm)

9-12 in. (22-30 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

Sun Exposure:

Light Shade

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Unknown - Tell us

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Evergreen

Mottled

Succulent

Other details:

Drought-tolerant; suitable for xeriscaping

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

Unknown - Tell us

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Phoenix, Arizona

Dallas, Texas

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
2
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Jan 21, 2015, poeciliopsis from Phoenix, AZ wrote:

Central Phoenix -- I have many specimens of Aloe Quicksilver. All of mine are progeny of one I originally planted in the late 1990s that is now a clump 10 inches in diameter. This cultivar seems to be quite resilient -- my plants are in the ground in a variety of micro-habitats, usually partial shade (varying from dense to filtered) and low water (dry to very dry). Most are uncovered in winter and have survived to 24F and several consecutive nights of sub-freezing.

Neutral

On Mar 23, 2014, Mr_Monopoly from North Olmsted, OH wrote:

Just bought this plant from the Midwest Cactus and Succulent Society's Annual Show and Sale in Cleveland. Being a member myself who specializes in cacti, I was hesitant to buy it, but it looks promising.

Neutral

On Mar 2, 2004, palmbob from Acton, CA (Zone 8b) wrote:

This is a hybrid of I don't know what.. has so many white spots that it's overall color is whitish. The plant is small, stemless and offsets. Has very small teeth and the leaf color, other than the white spots, is brownish. Cold hardiness is unknown since the only specimen I know of is in a cold frame.