Mandarin Orange, Satsuma, Tangerine
Citrus reticulata 'Clementine'

Family: Rutaceae (roo-TAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Citrus (SIT-rus) (Info)
Species: reticulata (reh-tick-yoo-LAY-tuh) (Info)
Cultivar: Clementine
Additional cultivar information:(aka Algerian Tangerine)

Category:

Edible Fruits and Nuts

Trees

Tropicals and Tender Perennials

Height:

10-12 ft. (3-3.6 m)

Spacing:

12-15 ft. (3.6-4.7 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

White/Near White

Bloom Time:

Unknown - Tell us

Foliage:

Evergreen

Aromatic

Smooth-Textured

Other details:

Flowers are fragrant

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

Unknown - Tell us

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Phoenix, Arizona

Davis, California

Paradise, California

Rialto, California

Summerfield, Florida

Wailuku, Hawaii

Brazoria, Texas

show all

Gardeners' Notes:

0
positives
2
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On Jun 30, 2010, ogon from Paradise, CA (Zone 9a) wrote:

The comment below states that clementines are easily hybridized and CA growers threatened to sue beekeepers. While both statements may be true, CA growers did not threaten to sue beekeepers because the trees are easily hybridized, it is because, when they are polinated by bees they are no longer "seedless" and often have many seeds. They are less marketable with seeds, thus hurting their livihood.

Also, my personal opinion is that clementines are the most inferior of the commonly marketed mandarines. They are very sweet with little flavor. Satsuma and Dancy have a better tart/sweet combination.

Neutral

On Dec 11, 2007, daisyavenue from Long Beach, CA (Zone 10b) wrote:

This is actually Citrus reticulata x Citrus auratium.

It is easily hybridized and in 2006 one of the larger California growers threatened to sue beekeepers for allowing their bees to trespass into Clementine crop areas.

Primarily grown in Spain and Northern Africa, Clementines gained popularity in the United States after the 1997 Florida freeze.

Father Clement Rodier, a missionary priest in Algeria, is said to have discovered and named them in 1902. Some track the origin centuries before to the Chinese variety called the Canton Mandarin.