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Loquat, Japanese Plum
Eriobotrya japonica 'Dwarf'

Family: Rosaceae (ro-ZAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Eriobotrya (er-ee-oh-BOT-ree-uh) (Info)
Species: japonica (juh-PON-ih-kuh) (Info)
Cultivar: Dwarf

Category:

Trees

Height:

15-20 ft. (4.7-6 m)

Spacing:

15-20 ft. (4.7-6 m)

20-30 ft. (6-9 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Cream/Tan

Bloom Time:

Late Summer/Early Fall

Mid Fall

Foliage:

Evergreen

Velvet/Fuzzy-Textured

Other details:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Flowers are fragrant

Soil pH requirements:

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From hardwood cuttings

From seed; direct sow after last frost

By air layering

Seed Collecting:

Remove fleshy coating on seeds before storing

Allow unblemished fruit to ripen; clean and dry seeds

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Vincent, Alabama

Elk Grove, California

Bartow, Florida

Brooksville, Florida

Cocoa, Florida

Lecanto, Florida

Niceville, Florida

Ocala, Florida

Rockledge, Florida

Titusville, Florida

Zephyrhills, Florida

Kure Beach, North Carolina

Bluffton, South Carolina

Summerville, South Carolina

La Porte, Texas

Richmond, Texas

show all

Gardeners' Notes:

2
positives
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Jul 6, 2012, wormfood from Lecanto, FL (Zone 9a) wrote:

A great ornamental looking tree for my area. Isn't fazed at all by our droughts or long cold spells. Takes foot traffic and roosting chickens. Cedar Waxwings stop by in early spring to eat the fruit within a couple of hours and move on. Fruit is a liitle too tart for my liking, like a citrusy peach.

Positive

On Mar 17, 2008, CoreHHI from Bluffton, SC (Zone 9a) wrote:

I picked a couple of these up from a hotel that was changing their landscaping. They had them planted indoors. I put them outside in a shady spot and they tripled in size in a couple of years. I have done nothing to them and they don't seem to be picky. No bug or any other problems, nice evergreen with a different look to it. I saw these planted in a park in full sun and I noticed they were dead by the end of the summer so I'm thinking they don't like the sun in zone 9.