Brazilian Coral Tree, Corticeira-da-Serra

Erythrina falcata

Family: Papilionaceae (pa-pil-ee-uh-NAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Erythrina (er-ith-RY-nuh) (Info)
Species: falcata (fal-KAY-tuh) (Info)

Category:

Trees

Tropicals and Tender Perennials

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Where to Grow:

Grow outdoors year-round

Height:

30-40 ft. (9-12 m)

Spacing:

over 40 ft. (12 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Danger:

Seed is poisonous if ingested

Bloom Color:

Red

Bloom Time:

Late Winter/Early Spring

Blooms repeatedly

Foliage:

Deciduous

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

Unknown - Tell us

Seed Collecting:

Allow seedheads to dry on plants; remove and collect seeds

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Arcadia, California

Canoga Park, California

Los Angeles, California

Spring Valley, California

Mulberry, Florida

Gardeners' Notes:

0
positives
2
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On Oct 21, 2016, coriaceous from ROSLINDALE, MA wrote:

The largest-growing of coral trees in wide cultivation. At maturity, it reaches 30-50' tall and as wide or wider. The crown is usually asymmetrical.

Judging from photographs, this seems to be the most spectacularly floriferous of coral trees.

Some leaves drop at flowering time, but depending on climate this species may be largely evergreen.

Can be grown from seed, but seed-grown plants will not flower for a decade or more. Cutting-grown plants (taken from blooming trees) come into bloom much sooner.

Like other coral trees, this is very spiny.

Neutral

On Apr 22, 2004, palmbob from Acton, CA (Zone 8b) wrote:

This is a marginal tree for many areas of So Cal, but it survives in zone 9b OK. Haven't seen its flowers yet... just discovered it in the Huntington Gardens in April and flowers already gone. Large tree there, though, near maximum height. This tree seems to be 'mostly' deciduous, but retains some leaves all the time.

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