Senecio
Senecio oxyriifolius subsp. tropaeolifolius

Family: Asteraceae (ass-ter-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Senecio (sen-ek-ee-o ) (Info)
Species: oxyriifolius subsp. tropaeolifolius
Synonym:Senecio tropaeolifolius

Category:

Groundcovers

Cactus and Succulents

Height:

under 6 in. (15 cm)

6-12 in. (15-30 cm)

Spacing:

12-15 in. (30-38 cm)

15-18 in. (38-45 cm)

18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

Sun Exposure:

Sun to Partial Shade

Light Shade

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Gold (Yellow-Orange)

Bloom Time:

Late Summer/Early Fall

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Evergreen

Succulent

Rubbery-Textured

Other details:

Drought-tolerant; suitable for xeriscaping

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

By dividing rhizomes, tubers, corms or bulbs (including offsets)

From herbaceous stem cuttings

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Lake Nacimiento, California

Seattle, Washington

Gardeners' Notes:

2
positives
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Nov 19, 2009, lazepherine from Seattle, WA wrote:

Another synonym for senecio oxyriifolius is senecio orbicularis. This is a tough little succulent vine - It survived two winters outdoors here in Seattle. Unfortunately this past winter was exceptionally cold so I lost it, but luckily I've acquired anther specimen. It has bright, golden-yellow blooms (the color of egg-yolks) a little garish, but much loved by pollinators, and typical of the senecios. Bloom stalks range from 6 to 16 inches long, are semi-pendulous like the floiage, then curve up at the ends to present their blossoms skywards. Contrast between the thick, rubbery, glaucous foliage and bloom color is striking. This vine has an interesting growth habit in that it does not seem to naturally branch until a bloom stalk has formed - at which point the single stem will divide into t... read more

Positive

On Sep 30, 2005, JRush from Guilford, CT (Zone 7a) wrote:

This is a fast growing succulent, also known as succulent Nasturtium. It is also used as a Bonsai specimen. The root system forms a gnarled structure, which is then exposed above the soil surface. Cuttings are easily rooted in damp sand/potting soil mix. So far I have been unable to control this plants growth - it prefers to be a vine rather than a Bonsai!
Julie

Neutral

On Mar 16, 2004, palmbob from Acton, CA (Zone 8b) wrote:

meandering groundcover with 2" succulent angular leaves, from South Africa.