Himalayan Blue Bamboo
Himalayacalamus hookerianus

Family: Poaceae (poh-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Himalayacalamus (him-uh-lay-uh-KAL-uh-mus) (Info)
Species: hookerianus (hook-er-ee-AN-us) (Info)
Synonym:Drepanostachyum falcatum

Category:

Ornamental Grasses and Bamboo

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Requires consistently moist soil; do not let dry out between waterings

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

12-15 ft. (3.6-4.7 m)

15-20 ft. (4.7-6 m)

Spacing:

10-12 ft. (3-3.6 m)

12-15 ft. (3.6-4.7 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Sun Exposure:

Sun to Partial Shade

Light Shade

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Unknown - Tell us

Foliage:

Evergreen

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

By dividing rhizomes, tubers, corms or bulbs (including offsets)

This plant is monocarpic

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

San Francisco, California

San Leandro, California

Santa Barbara, California

Temecula, California

Thousand Oaks, California

Ventura, California

show all

Gardeners' Notes:

3
positives
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Dec 23, 2012, sbrown044 from mataura
New Zealand wrote:

I spent years in the indian himalayan foothills. this species is very hardy and grows at altitudes of 1880 meters or 6000 ft above sea level. the climate was very cold in winter (2-3 feet of snow for 3 months (dec-feb) yet summers in the 30s celcius or 86 deg fahrenheit plus ( up to 104 f) in some places. very hardy, and large clumping bamboo. culms are large enough to use as scaffolding and are used as such. soils they grow in are generally poor ( clay and shingle), and under trees yet also out in the open too. hence i would say very hardy and useful. the blue hue of culms takes time to develop and rubs off after harvesting leaving a green or gold colour.very attractive and even more useful bamboo! about to buy my first one to plant in southland NZ. already have bambusa multiplex, japan... read more

Positive

On Jun 3, 2005, dianella from melbourne
Australia wrote:

If it goes to seed which is very unlikly though in th uk it seed s all the time, fertiliser and water will prevent it dying

Positive

On Mar 27, 2004, palmbob from Acton, CA (Zone 8b) wrote:

This is one of the most colorful bamboos and is my favorite. It has 1/2" culms of an incredible turquoise, that turn purple its first winter. Leaves are a very tropical looking bright green. Clumper and slow growing (best to start with a plant in a large 15gal, or else you will be waiting years for the great blue culms- smaller culms are a less interesting brownish color). It can be a bit tricky to grow and seems to like to be wet more than most other bamboo I've had. Usually sold under the synonym Drepanostacyum falcatum.