Soap Berry, Wild Chinaberry, Florida Soap Berry, Soap Nut, Soap Tree
Sapindus saponaria

Family: Sapindaceae (sap-in-DAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Sapindus (sap-IN-dus) (Info)
Species: saponaria (sap-oh-NAIR-ee-uh) (Info)
View this plant in a garden

Category:

Trees

Height:

20-30 ft. (6-9 m)

30-40 ft. (9-12 m)

over 40 ft. (12 m)

Spacing:

Unknown - Tell us

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Danger:

Parts of plant are poisonous if ingested

Bloom Color:

Cream/Tan

Bloom Time:

Late Winter/Early Spring

Foliage:

Evergreen

Other details:

Flowers are fragrant

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Requires consistently moist soil; do not let dry out between waterings

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

Unknown - Tell us

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Pomona, California

Solana Beach, California

Omega, Georgia

Austin, Texas

Belton, Texas

Crockett, Texas

Liberty Hill, Texas

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Gardeners' Notes:

0
positives
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On Apr 3, 2004, Monocromatico from Rio de Janeiro
Brazil (Zone 11) wrote:

This tree comes from tropical America. The fruits curiously make a foam with soap-like properties if you press them against some humid surface, so its used as a natural soap in some places.

It is a good looking tree, getting up to 15m high. It has composite, light green leaves. Flowers are small, white, grouped in panicles. The fruits are round, yellow berries, that become gummy, red and wrinkled as it gets ripen. All parts of this plant can be poisonous if ingested, but I am not sure.

It needs moist, fertile soil, full sun, high temperatures, and regular watering.