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Tomatillo, Husk Tomato, Miltomate, Tomate de Fresadilla
Physalis ixocarpa 'Purple'

Family: Solanaceae (so-lan-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Physalis (fy-SAL-is) (Info)
Species: ixocarpa (iks-so-KAR-puh) (Info)
Cultivar: Purple
Additional cultivar information:(aka Morado)

Category:

Vegetables

Tropicals and Tender Perennials

Height:

24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

Spacing:

24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Unknown - Tell us

Foliage:

Unknown - Tell us

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

From seed; sow indoors before last frost

Seed Collecting:

Allow unblemished fruit to ripen; clean and dry seeds

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Mobile, Alabama

Slaughter, Louisiana

Brown City, Michigan

Livonia, Michigan

North Charleston, South Carolina

Liberty Hill, Texas

show all

Gardeners' Notes:

0
positives
2
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On Mar 22, 2013, annieshinko from charleston
United States wrote:

I grew the purple tomatillo last season and the plant grew huge, probably the biggest thing in my (small) garden. It had over 50 tiny yellow flowers all summer long and no fruit. After some research, I found out that there has to be 2 plants to cross pollinate. So this year I am going to try again and hopefully get some fruit!

Neutral

On Apr 26, 2004, Farmerdill from Augusta, GA (Zone 8a) wrote:

This a medium large (0.7 ounces) purple fruited tomatillo which yielded about 15 tons/acre in the Purdue field trials.