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PlantFiles: Lesser Glory-of-the-Snow, Turkish Glory of the Snow
Chionodoxa sardensis

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Family: Hyacinthaceae
Genus: Chionodoxa (kye-oh-no-DOKS-uh) (Info)
Species: sardensis

One vendor has this plant for sale.

3 members have or want this plant for trade.

Category:
Alpines and Rock Gardens
Bulbs

Height:
under 6 in. (15 cm)

Spacing:
3-6 in. (7-15 cm)

Hardiness:
USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 C (-30 F)
USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 C (-25 F)
USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)
USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)
USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)
USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)
USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)
USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)
USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)
USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

Sun Exposure:
Sun to Partial Shade
Light Shade

Danger:
All parts of plant are poisonous if ingested

Bloom Color:
Medium Blue

Bloom Time:
Late Winter/Early Spring

Foliage:
Herbaceous

Other details:
Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Soil pH requirements:
6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)
6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)
7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:
Non-patented

Propagation Methods:
By dividing rhizomes, tubers, corms or bulbs (including offsets)

Seed Collecting:
Unknown - Tell us

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to view:

By Todd_Boland
Thumbnail #1 of Chionodoxa sardensis by Todd_Boland

By sladeofsky
Thumbnail #2 of Chionodoxa sardensis by sladeofsky

Profile:

1 positive
No neutrals
No negatives

Gardeners' Notes:

RatingAuthorContent
Positive coriaceous On Mar 31, 2014, coriaceous from ROSLINDALE, MA wrote:

Intense blue with a violet tint. A smaller plant with smaller flowers than C. luciliae or C. forbesii, but the color is much more intense.

Tough, easy, adaptable. Naturalizes well in lawns and beds, in full sun or woodland conditions. Blooms in earliest spring, at the same time as Scilla sibirica.

As with all small bulbs, this is best planted in large masses (by the hundred) for good impact in the landscape. Its self-sowing would be problematic in rock gardens.

Easily and inexpensively available from mail order dealers of fall bulbs.

Regional...

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

,
Louisville, Kentucky
Roslindale, Massachusetts
Royal Oak, Michigan
Norristown, Pennsylvania
Kinnear, Wyoming
Pavillion, Wyoming
Riverton, Wyoming



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