Log Fern
Dryopteris celsa

Family: Dryopteridaceae
Genus: Dryopteris (dry-OP-ter-iss) (Info)
Species: celsa (SEL-suh) (Info)

Category:

Ferns

Height:

36-48 in. (90-120 cm)

Spacing:

18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 C (-25 F)

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

Sun Exposure:

Partial to Full Shade

Full Shade

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Inconspicuous/none

Bloom Time:

N/A

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Evergreen

Other details:

This plant may be considered a protected species; check before digging or gathering seeds

Soil pH requirements:

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

By dividing the rootball

From spores

Seed Collecting:

N/A: plant does not set seed, flowers are sterile, or plants will not come true from seed

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Laurel, Maryland

Lincroft, New Jersey

Brooklyn, New York

Charlotte, North Carolina

West Chester, Pennsylvania

Gardeners' Notes:

2
positives
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Feb 3, 2014, Rickwebb from Downingtown, PA wrote:

It is a handsome fern native to the eastern US with tall, dark, heavy weight fronds. I have only seen it at Tyler Arboretum and at two expensive landscapes in the west suburbs of Philadelphia, PA, designed by a professional landscape company. It is not just sold everywhere and is not found in the wild just everywhere.

Positive

On May 10, 2012, mgurley from Charlotte, NC wrote:

Very nice tall (36-48") evergreen fern. Easy to grow, can take some morning sun, filtered sun or deep shade. Fast growing for a bigger fern.

Neutral

On Jun 27, 2007, Cretaceous from El Sobrante, CA (Zone 9b) wrote:

Native to the eastern United States (Michigan, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Illinois, Missouri, Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia).

This fern is considered a threatened/endangered species in the states of Illinois, Maryland, Michigan, New York, Ohio, and Pennsylvania.