Texas Red Oak, Nuttall Oak, Red River Oak
Quercus texana

Family: Fagaceae (fag-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Quercus (KWER-kus) (Info)
Species: texana (tek-SAY-nuh) (Info)
Synonym:Quercus nuttallii
Synonym:Quercus nuttallii var. cachensis
Synonym:Quercus rubra var. texana
Synonym:Quercus shumardii var. microcarpa
Synonym:Quercus shumardii var. texana

Category:

Trees

Height:

over 40 ft. (12 m)

Spacing:

30-40 ft. (9-12 m)

over 40 ft. (12 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

Inconspicuous/none

Bloom Time:

N/A

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Deciduous

Burgundy

Good Fall Color

Other details:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

Unknown - Tell us

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Morrilton, Arkansas

Umatilla, Florida

Locust Grove, Georgia

Olathe, Kansas

Arnold, Maryland

Madison, Mississippi

Oxford, Mississippi

Manheim, Pennsylvania

Christiana, Tennessee

Dickson, Tennessee

Austin, Texas

Bandera, Texas

Georgetown, Texas

Richmond, Texas

show all

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On Sep 30, 2010, victorengel from Austin, TX wrote:

This species, which is a Mississippi Valley species and whose range barely extends into Texas, should not be confused with Q. buckleyi (also called Texas Red Oak), which is from areas like Central Texas. Unfortunately, both species (also Q. gravesii) have been called Q. texana at some point.

Positive

On May 18, 2004, Terry from Murfreesboro, TN (Zone 7a) wrote:

Sources indicate the Nuttall Oak wasn't recognized as a separate species until the 1920s.

We received two free saplings at our local Home & Garden show last year, and so far, I'm impressed with the robust growth and beautiful spring foliage. Rutherford county (middle Tennessee) is dominated by stands of lovely Oak trees, but our specific neighborhood has surprisingly few. We're hoping to set an example and encourage our neighbors to plant more of these beauties.