Cauliflower
Brassica oleracea var. botrytis 'Cheddar'

Family: Brassicaceae (brass-ih-KAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Brassica (BRAS-ee-ka) (Info)
Species: oleracea var. botrytis
Cultivar: Cheddar
Additional cultivar information:(formerly Citrus)

Category:

Vegetables

Height:

18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

Spacing:

18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

Hardiness:

Not Applicable

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Bright Yellow

Bloom Time:

N/A

Foliage:

Herbaceous

Veined

Other details:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

From seed; sow indoors before last frost

Seed Collecting:

N/A: plant does not set seed, flowers are sterile, or plants will not come true from seed

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Oceanside, California

Richmond, Texas

South Padre Island, Texas

Gardeners' Notes:

2
positives
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Jan 18, 2012, vossner from Richmond, TX (Zone 9a) wrote:

The Cheddar variety has a wonderful yellow/orange color (like cheddar cheese) that it retains when cooked. Plant them in your Houston, Texas flower bed in September. They prefer the full sun, and are a great addition to salads. Harvest this vegetable after 80 days. If container grown, the heads will be smaller. Pulling leaves over the heads, as done with white varieties, is not necessary when growing 'Cheddar'.

Positive

On Jan 6, 2011, Calalily from Deep South Coastal, TX (Zone 10a) wrote:

This cauliflower performs well for me as long as the plants are spaced correctly. If crowded, the heads will be smaller. It has a great flavor and produces large heads. Do not pull the leaves over the head as it needs sunlight to produce the nice orange coloring.

Neutral

On May 18, 2004, Farmerdill from Augusta, GA (Zone 8a) wrote:

An early orange hybrid. Orange cauliflower has been an ongoing reseach project by Michael Dickson at Cornell University's Geneva Station. A proto type was released to seed companies in 1989 and each has generated experimental cultivars. This is one of the few that is available to home gardeners.