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Northern Pin Oak, Hill's Oak
Quercus ellipsoidalis

Family: Fagaceae (fag-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Quercus (KWER-kus) (Info)
Species: ellipsoidalis (e-lip-soy-DAY-lis) (Info)

Category:

Trees

Height:

over 40 ft. (12 m)

Spacing:

20-30 ft. (6-9 m)

30-40 ft. (9-12 m)

over 40 ft. (12 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 3a: to -39.9 C (-40 F)

USDA Zone 3b: to -37.2 C (-35 F)

USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 C (-30 F)

USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 C (-25 F)

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Brown/Bronze

Inconspicuous/none

Bloom Time:

Mid Spring

N/A

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Deciduous

Other details:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Soil pH requirements:

5.1 to 5.5 (strongly acidic)

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

Unknown - Tell us

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Marietta, Georgia

Hampton, Illinois

Andover, Kansas

Tecumseh, Michigan

Inver Grove Heights, Minnesota

Minneapolis, Minnesota

South Saint Paul, Minnesota

Bucyrus, Ohio

Greensburg, Pennsylvania

Elmwood, Wisconsin

Rhinelander, Wisconsin

show all

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Dec 23, 2004, riversandbar from Inver Grove Heights, MN (Zone 4b) wrote:

The leaves of Northern Pin Oak (Quercus ellipsoidalis) can be distinguished from Northern Red Oak (Quercus rubra) by the deep sinuses and shiny surface of the former compared to the shallow sinuses and (often) dull surfaces of the latter. The leaves of Northern Pin Oak (Q. ellipsoidalis) are similar to those of Scarlet Oak (Q. coccinea), Pin Oak (Q. palustris) and Black Oak (Q. velutina). The first two are very rare in southern Wisconsin and Minnesota. Black Oak (Q. velutina) is more common, but is mostly southern also.

Northern Pin Oak (Quercus ellipsoidalis) is distributed primarily in the middle and western parts of the Great Lakes region -- from central Michigan east to noth-central Wisconsin, eastern Iowa, northern Illinois, and northern Indiana. Disjunct populations ... read more