Dwarf Snowbush, Snow Bush, Snow-on-the-Mountain, Sweetpea Bush
Breynia disticha 'Minima'

Family: Euphorbiaceae (yoo-for-bee-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Breynia (BRAY-nee-uh) (Info)
Species: disticha (DIS-tik-uh) (Info)
Cultivar: Minima
Synonym:Breynia nivosa
Synonym:Phyllanthus nivosus

Category:

Shrubs

Tropicals and Tender Perennials

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Where to Grow:

This plant is suitable for growing indoors

Height:

12-18 in. (30-45 cm)

18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

Spacing:

18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Sun Exposure:

Sun to Partial Shade

Light Shade

Partial to Full Shade

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

Green

Inconspicuous/none

Bloom Time:

N/A

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Evergreen

Variegated

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

By dividing rhizomes, tubers, corms or bulbs (including offsets)

From woody stem cuttings

Seed Collecting:

Allow pods to dry on plant; break open to collect seeds

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Bartow, Florida

Groveland, Florida

Sarasota, Florida

West Palm Beach, Florida

Chalmette, Louisiana

Falls Church, Virginia

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Gardeners' Notes:

4
positives
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Dec 13, 2010, kiwifish23 from Hollywood, FL wrote:

I am looking for this plant locally and cannot find it. Please, does anyone know if there is a nursery in the South Florida area where they sell these?
Thank you

Positive

On Apr 14, 2006, lamabry from Raleigh, NC (Zone 7b) wrote:

I grow it in full sun in Clayton, NC, during the Summer, and in clay soil. It's easy to grow, no pest problems, and beautiful until the cold weather kills it.

Neutral

On Jun 8, 2004, Pruss from Fort Lauderdale, FL wrote:

I live in South Florida but away from salt air. The plants are about 18 inches tall and have only been in the ground about 2 weeks. They are thriving well and look beautiful with new growth coming out already. Problem: There are several little caterpillers on the plants already. They haven't eaten much and I've sprayed the entire plant area with liquid Sevin. Will this take care of my problem? The caterpillers are a little more than an inch long, very slender with yellowish bodies and black at the tip of the head and black feet. The moths that laid the eggs are most certainly smallish black creatures with orange heads as those are the ones I've seen fluttering around the bushes.

Positive

On May 25, 2004, MotherNature4 from Bartow, FL (Zone 9a) wrote:

My dwarf Breynia is container grown outside in light shade. It is most attractive, but not as compact as the one pictured above. Before entering it in a flower show, I will see that the light is increased to bring out the pink color.

It never did get any pink in the leaves. Guess it isn't meant to be anything by shades of green and white.

Positive

On May 22, 2004, LouisianaSweetPea from Mount Hermon, LA (Zone 8b) wrote:

I purchased and am growing this plant in Zone 9a (around the New Orleans area).

Breynia disticha 'Minima' is very compact-growning with tiny white-and-green leaves and pinkish tones in the new growth. Its growth habit is round and growth rate is moderate.

The branches of this shrub are slender, wiry, reddish, and appear to zig-zag. Snow bush has green, petal-less flowers that occur in axillary clusters on long peduncles; the flowers are mostly inconspicuous due to the striking foliage. The fruits are red berries that are 3/8-inch wide.

This shrub is from the South Pacific and is commonly used as a hedge plant. It can be used as a specimen plant, in mass plantings, as a border or foundation plant, and can be grown indoors.

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