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Bird's Nest Fern
Asplenium australasicum

Family: Aspleniaceae
Genus: Asplenium (ass-PLEE-nee-um) (Info)
Species: australasicum (aw-stra-LAY-see-kum) (Info)

Category:

Perennials

Ferns

Height:

4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)

Spacing:

Unknown - Tell us

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

Sun Exposure:

Partial to Full Shade

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Unknown - Tell us

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Evergreen

Other details:

This plant is suitable for growing indoors

Requires consistently moist soil; do not let dry out between waterings

Suitable for growing in containers

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

Unknown - Tell us

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Chula Vista, California

Hayward, California

Miami, Florida

Orlando, Florida

Pompano Beach, Florida

West Palm Beach, Florida

show all

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Mar 2, 2009, BayAreaTropics from Hayward, CA wrote:

I purchased my plant in the summer of 06. A good sized healthy plant in a 6" pot. It quickly outgrew that, so was transfered to a 16" coconut liner basket. I then started to feed it a premium fertilizer and it responded with tremendous growth. In less than three years fronds have reached 4 and a half feet and still getting larger and larger. Never covered in 07's California freeze. Yet,not a mark on it from cold.
This is the TRUE Birds nest fern. Subtropical with good cold tolerance rather than the true A. nidas that is wholey tropical and cannot be grown outdoors in California. To tell the difference is easy-if it lives through a winter-it's A. australasicum!.for the more technical minded,look at the keel of the fronds midrib..if its UNDER the frond,its A. australasicum,if the kee... read more