Lilac
Syringa 'Betsy Ross'

Family: Oleaceae (oh-lee-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Syringa (si-RING-gah) (Info)
Cultivar: Betsy Ross

Category:

Shrubs

Height:

8-10 ft. (2.4-3 m)

Spacing:

6-8 ft. (1.8-2.4 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

White/Near White

Bloom Time:

Mid Spring

Foliage:

Deciduous

Other details:

Flowers are fragrant

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From semi-hardwood cuttings

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

,

San Anselmo, California

Wayne, Nebraska

Hulbert, Oklahoma

Helotes, Texas

Manassas, Virginia

show all

Gardeners' Notes:

2
positives
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Jun 2, 2011, b_schr from Wayne, NE (Zone 4b) wrote:

This like the other lilacs I have grown does well in zone 4. Around here (NE Nebraska) lilacs in general handle dry feet and heat well once established. So the first season and sporadically as needed the second season, I water with a deep root waterer to lure the roots down deeper. After that they're fine getting along with rainfall.

Positive

On Mar 26, 2010, kjay from Helotes, TX wrote:

I grew up in the North, so when I moved to San Antonio, TX, I missed seeing lilacs in the Spring. I researched, and found that the Betsy Ross was designed for the South. I sent for one, and planted it where it would get morning sun. The first year I got very few blooms, the second a few more, and this Spring it's full of blooms (relatively speaking). Last summer, San Antonio had about 60 days over 100 degrees in a severe drought, so the plant proved that it could survive in warm, dry weather (with supplemental water, of course). The flowers look and smell great even if they are white.